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Interactions.org - Particle Physics News and Resources

A communication resource from the world's particle physics laboratories

Particle Physics Photowalk

Competition

The InterAction Collaboration invited participating photographers to submit photos for local and global competitions. Each laboratory conducted its own local competition and selected 20 winners. In the spirit of friendly competition, the top three photos from each laboratory competed in two global competitions: a jury competition and a people's choice competition conducted via online vote.

The winners of all Photowalk competitions can now be viewed on Flickr. In early 2011, all participating laboratories will host an exhibition of their local winning photographs. The top winners of the global competitions will appear in each laboratory's exhibit and in the particle physics publications symmetry and the CERN Courier.

Jury Competition

1st Place

Global Jury - 1st Place
Photographer: Mikey Enriquez
Laboratory: TRIUMF

This image of the 8Pi nuclear-physics experiment won first place in the global jury competition, and third place in TRIUMF's local competition. The muted black and white image of the 8Pi experiment's inner detectors captures the beauty and symmetry of physics.

2nd Place

Global Jury - 2nd Place
Photographer: Hans-Peter Hildebrandt
Laboratory: DESY

This portrait of a wire chamber won first place in the people's choice global competition, second place in the global jury competition, and first place in DESY's local competition. This highly symmetrical image of a particle detector fascinated every member of the jury immediately. The rays leading from the centre, ending in a dark rim, separating the chamber's sectors, and large hole in the middle that allows a blurry view of the things behind, evoke the image of a large eye. The jury called it "technically flawless and simply fascinating."

3rd Place

Global Jury - 3rd Place
Photographer: Heiko Roemisch
Laboratory: DESY

This image of two quadrupole magnets won third place in the global jury competition and second place in DESY's local competition. The global jury noted the photo's sense of humor, and the DESY jury's association with this image was "monstrous force." The image manages to combine seemingly contradictory things – there is no doubt that its subject is something technical, mechanic, scientific, but at the time the coils of the quadrupole magnets seem organic, like two greedy mouths. A well crafted visualisation of technical processes that captures the beholder's attention.

Global Judges

Stanley Greenberg is the author of three books; Invisible New York: The Hidden Infrastructure of the City, Waterworks: A Photographic Journey Through New York's Hidden Water System, and Architecture Under Construction. His next book, about high energy physics, will be published in 2011. His work has been exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Greenberg is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a book grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Meghan McAteer is pursuing a PhD in physics at the University of Texas at Austin. A student in the Joint University-Fermilab Doctoral Program in accelerator physics, she is currently researching methods of improving beam quality and intensity in Fermilab's Booster accelerator. Meghan also holds a degree in studio art from the University of Texas at Austin. Her work, which is primarily in ceramic and bronze, is influenced by George Ohr and Henry Moore.

Simon Norfolk was born in 1963 in Lagos, Nigeria. After an early career as a photojournalist for left-wing publications and latterly for Sunday magazines in the UK, he now lives and works overlooking the sea in Brighton on the south coast of England. Simon is a landscape photographer whose work is a probing of the meaning of the word battlefield in all its forms. He is driven by a keen interest in the political forces shaping the world, especially the wars in the Middle East and the technologies and strategies that go into fighting these wars. Although active in the art world, much of his work is initially produced for magazines, in particular the fruit of a long relationship with the New York Times Magazine. He is represented by Bonni Benrubi (New York), Gallery Luisotti (Los Angeles) and Michael Hoppen Contemporary (London).

People's Choice Competition

1st Place

People's Choice - 1st Place
Photographer: Hans-Peter Hildebrandt
Laboratory: DESY

This portrait of a wire chamber won first place in the people's choice global competition, second place in the global jury competition, and first place in DESY's local competition. This highly symmetrical image of a particle detector fascinated every member of the jury immediately. The rays leading from the centre, ending in a dark rim, separating the chamber's sectors, and large hole in the middle that allows a blurry view of the things behind, evoke the image of a large eye. The jury called it "technically flawless and simply fascinating."

2nd Place

People's Choice - 2nd Place
Photographer: Tony Reynes
Laboratory: Fermilab

This image of an accelerator operator on shift in Fermilab's Main Control Room captured second place in the people's choice global vote and third place in Fermilab's local competition. The Main Control Room is a mission control center where scientists monitor the laboratory's accelerator complex 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

3rd Place

People's Choice - 3rd Place
Photographer: Matthias Teschke
Laboratory: DESY

This classic image of HERA's accelerator tunnel captured third place in the people's choice global vote, and third place in DESY's local competition. The photographer manages to guide the view around the corner and make the viewer curious about what's behind the bend. The image plays with light and shadow, conveys a sense of space, almost infinity, while at the same time incorporating technicality.

More than 1,300 photography enthusiasts took part in an online vote to choose the winners of the 2010 Global Particle Physics Photowalk People's Choice competition.