< Back to Navigation

Interactions.org - Particle Physics News and Resources

A communication resource from the world's particle physics laboratories

404 Search Results

Sort By: Image # Lab Date  
  • Image# SL0115
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Future particle colliders will require highly efficient acceleration methods for both electrons and positrons. Plasma wakefield acceleration of both particle types, as shown in this simulation, could lead to smaller and more powerful colliders than today’s machines. (F. Tsung/W. An/UCLA/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0116
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Simulation of high-energy positron acceleration in an ionized gas, or plasma – a new method that could help power next-generation particle colliders. The image shows the formation of a high-density plasma (green/orange color) around a positron beam moving from the bottom right to the top left. Plasma electrons pass by the positron beam on wave-like trajectories (lines). (W. An/UCLA)

  • Image# SL0117
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Computer simulations of the interaction of electrons (left, red areas) and positrons (right, red areas) with a plasma. The approximate locations of tightly packed bundles of particles, or bunches, are within the dashed lines. Left: For electrons, a drive bunch (on the right) generates a plasma wake (white area) on which a trailing electron bunch (on the left) gains energy. Right: For positrons, a single bunch can interact with the plasma in such a way that the front of the bunch generates a wake that accelerates the bunch tail. (W. An/UCLA)

  • Image# BN0056
  • BN
  • 08/02/2015

Crowds of visitors got a chance to see the Center for Functional Nanomaterails, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. (Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# FN3197
  • FN
  • 07/08/2015

Fermilab's Main Injector accelerator, one of the most powerful particle accelerators in the world, has just achieved a world record for high-energy beams for neutrino experiments.

  • Image# DE0111
  • DE
  • 07/07/2015

The HERA accelerator at DESY in Hamburg was unique in that it smashed two totally different kinds of particles into each other – protons and electrons or positrons. HERA thus consists of two different accelerator rings: a superconducting proton ring and a normal-conducting electron ring. HERA ran from 1990 to 2007.

  • Image# BN0055
  • BN
  • 06/16/2015

Ferdinand Willeke stande next to an "insertion device," a component of the internal accelerator system for the National Synchrotron Light Source II. (Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0469
  • FN
  • 02/23/2015

Jason Bono - Rice University, Dan Ambrose - University of Minnesota, and Richie Bonventre - LBNL (LtoR) work on Mu2e Straw Chamber Tracker Unit at Lab 3. Phtographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0468
  • FN
  • 02/11/2015

Clay Barton with Muon g-2 storage ring. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0467
  • FN
  • 02/10/2015

Steve Krave working at IB2 on magnet coil for JLab. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0464
  • FN
  • 01/29/2015

NuMI Horn at MI 8. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0463
  • FN
  • 01/26/2015

QXF Quadrupole Mirror Magnet during assembly at IB3. Pictured: Steve Gould. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0459
  • FN
  • 01/15/2015

Spoke Test Cryostat (STC) at Meson Test Cave. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0460
  • FN
  • 01/15/2015

Spoke Test Cryostat (STC) at Meson Test Cave. People: Leonardo Ristori. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0461
  • FN
  • 01/09/2015

Mu2e transport solenoid coil module prototype. People: Giorgio Ambrosio. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# FN0458
  • FN
  • 01/08/2015

Tevatron magnets being moved from the Magnet Storage Building to the Railhead Yard. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0114
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. The simulation shown here depicts two electron bunches - containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each – that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# OT0172
  • OT
  • 03/19/2014

This graphic shows the four individual top quark mass measurements published by the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations, together with the joint and most precise measurement obtained in a joint analysis. The ATLAS and CMS experiment recorded top quark events using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the CDF and DZero experiments recorded top quark events using the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Image courtesy ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations. (Credit: CERN/Fermilab)

  • Image# BE0002
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

The positron source of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider II. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0001
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

On the early morning of November 18, 2006, the first electron beam was successfully accumulated in the storage ring of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider II. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0019
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

An overview of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. As part of Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) project, BSRF offers synchrotron light for a wide variety of important research in fields including biology, chemistry and materials science. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# FN0427
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A view of the top of the nearly completed NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The detector is made up of 28 PVC blocks, each weighing 417,000 pounds, and spans 51 feet by 51 feet by 200 feet. When it is completed and filled with liquid scintillator, the far detector will weigh 14,000 tons. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# FN0429
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014, with the nearly completed detector in the background. Each block of the detector measures about 50 feet by 50 feet by 6 feet and is made up of 384 plastic PVC modules, assembled flat on a massive pivoting machine. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

Page 1 of 17

Images from the Interactions.org website may be downloaded, reproduced and published free of charge for use in newspapers, online news sites, educational materials and websites, and other not-for-profit educational outlets. For other uses, please request permission. All the images from the Interactions.org image bank are the property of the contributing organizations. The credit line accompanying each photo must appear, as listed, in the publication.