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  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0114
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. The simulation shown here depicts two electron bunches - containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each – that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# OT0172
  • OT
  • 03/19/2014

This graphic shows the four individual top quark mass measurements published by the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations, together with the joint and most precise measurement obtained in a joint analysis. The ATLAS and CMS experiment recorded top quark events using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the CDF and DZero experiments recorded top quark events using the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Image courtesy ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations. (Credit: CERN/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0427
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A view of the top of the nearly completed NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The detector is made up of 28 PVC blocks, each weighing 417,000 pounds, and spans 51 feet by 51 feet by 200 feet. When it is completed and filled with liquid scintillator, the far detector will weigh 14,000 tons. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# FN0429
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014, with the nearly completed detector in the background. Each block of the detector measures about 50 feet by 50 feet by 6 feet and is made up of 384 plastic PVC modules, assembled flat on a massive pivoting machine. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# BN0047
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

A welder works on the first superconducting radiofrequency cavity installed at RHIC. Superconductivity allows the cavity to operate at higher voltage than conventional cavities, thus producing a stronger focusing force for ion beams. After commissioning, the cavity should further increase RHIC's collision rates. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0048
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

At the heart of the PHENIX detector (top), a silicon vertex tracker (green layers behind the "X" shaped black structure in bottom image) surrounds the point where collisions take place. Together with forward silicon vertex trackers at each end of the barrel (one being adjusted by technician Mike Lenz), these components identify and count the decay products of particles made of heavy quarks streaming out of RHIC collisions. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0049
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

Technician Mike Myers checks components of stochastic cooling "kickers," which generate electric fields to nudge ions in RHIC's gold beams back into tightly packed bunches. This system of squeezing and cooling beams has produced dramatic increases in collision rates—and the data coming out of RHIC. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0050
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

The central portion of the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) being installed at RHIC's STAR detector (top), and the surrounding portion before installation (bottom). The HFT will track particles made of "charm" and "beauty" quarks, rare varieties (or "flavors") that are more massive than the lighter "up" and "down" quarks that make up ordinary matter. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# SL0106
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

Nanofabricated chips of fused silica just 3 millimeters long were used to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional particle accelerator technology. (Courtesy: Brad Plummer/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0107
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

The key to the accelerator chips is tiny, precisely spaced ridges, which cause the iridescence seen in this close-up photo. (Courtesy: Brad Plummer/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0108
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

The nanoscale patterns of SLAC and Stanford's accelerator on a chip gleam in rainbow colors prior to being assembled and cut into their final forms. (Courtesy: Matt Beardsley/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0109
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

Many of the SLAC and Stanford researchers who helped create the accelerator on a chip are pictured in SLAC's NLCTA lab where the experiments took place. Left to right: Robert Byer, Ken Soong, Dieter Walz, Ken Leedle, Ziran Wu, Edgar Peralta, Jim Spencer and Joel England. (Courtesy: Matt Beardsley/SLAC)

  • Image# LB0056
  • LB
  • 08/21/2013

The Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment is designed to provide new understanding of neutrino oscillations that can help answer some of the most mysterious questions about the universe. Shown here are the photomultiplier tubes in the Daya Bay detectors. (Courtesy: Roy Kaltschmidt)

  • Image# LB0057
  • LB
  • 08/21/2013

Daya Bay's detectors are immersed in the large water pools of the muon veto system. (Courtesy: Roy Kaltschmidt)

  • Image# FN0420
  • FN
  • 07/11/2013

At Fermilab's Vertical Magnet Test Facility, the new HQ02a quadrupole achieved all its challenging objectives. (Courtesy: Guram Chlachidze, Fermilab)

  • Image# OT0161
  • OT
  • 06/12/2013

Render of International Linear Collider - Next-generation particle accelerator (Courtesy: Rey.Hori/KEK)

  • Image# OT0162
  • OT
  • 06/12/2013

International Linear Collider conceptual diagram - Next-generation particle accelerator (Courtesy: ILC GDE)

  • Image# FN0418
  • FN
  • 06/12/2013

Crews work to attach the red stabilizing apparatus to the Muon g-2 rings at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York in preparation for moving them over land and sea to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. (Courtesy: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0416
  • FN
  • 05/08/2013

The Muon g-2 storage ring, in its current location at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. The ring, which will capture muons in a magnetic field, must be transported in one piece, and moved flat to avoid undue pressure on the superconducting cable inside. (Courtesy: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0413
  • FN
  • 05/02/2013

Image of one of the first bubbles seen in the COUPP-60 detector, located half a mile underground at SNOLAB in Ontario, Canada. The bubble appears as a black semi-circle on the lower left-hand side of the image. The white ovals in the center are reflections of LED lights. (Courtesy: SNOLAB)

  • Image# FN0414
  • FN
  • 05/02/2013

The COUPP-60 detector installed at the SNOLAB underground laboratory in Ontario, Canada. (Courtesy: SNOLAB)

  • Image# FN0415
  • FN
  • 05/02/2013

Scientists install the COUPP-60 detector a mile and a half underground at SNOLAB in Ontario, Canada. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0408
  • FN
  • 03/28/2013

When completed, the NOvA detector will comprise 28 detector blocks, each measuring about 50 feet tall, 50 feet wide and 6 feet deep. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

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