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  • Image# SL0110
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The Dark Sector Lab (DSL), located 3/4 of a mile from the Geographic South Pole, houses the BICEP2 telescope (left) and the South Pole Telescope (right). (Courtesy: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)

  • Image# FN0427
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A view of the top of the nearly completed NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The detector is made up of 28 PVC blocks, each weighing 417,000 pounds, and spans 51 feet by 51 feet by 200 feet. When it is completed and filled with liquid scintillator, the far detector will weigh 14,000 tons. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# FN0429
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014, with the nearly completed detector in the background. Each block of the detector measures about 50 feet by 50 feet by 6 feet and is made up of 384 plastic PVC modules, assembled flat on a massive pivoting machine. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# BN0047
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

A welder works on the first superconducting radiofrequency cavity installed at RHIC. Superconductivity allows the cavity to operate at higher voltage than conventional cavities, thus producing a stronger focusing force for ion beams. After commissioning, the cavity should further increase RHIC's collision rates. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0048
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

At the heart of the PHENIX detector (top), a silicon vertex tracker (green layers behind the "X" shaped black structure in bottom image) surrounds the point where collisions take place. Together with forward silicon vertex trackers at each end of the barrel (one being adjusted by technician Mike Lenz), these components identify and count the decay products of particles made of heavy quarks streaming out of RHIC collisions. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0049
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

Technician Mike Myers checks components of stochastic cooling "kickers," which generate electric fields to nudge ions in RHIC's gold beams back into tightly packed bunches. This system of squeezing and cooling beams has produced dramatic increases in collision rates—and the data coming out of RHIC. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0050
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

The central portion of the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) being installed at RHIC's STAR detector (top), and the surrounding portion before installation (bottom). The HFT will track particles made of "charm" and "beauty" quarks, rare varieties (or "flavors") that are more massive than the lighter "up" and "down" quarks that make up ordinary matter. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# CE0340
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

ASACUSA (Courtesy: Yasunori, Yamakazi)

  • Image# CE0342
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago. (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice)

  • Image# CE0343
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

Electrostatic protocol treatment lens device transport Antiprotons new ELENA storage beam AD experiments successfully tested ASACUSA

  • Image# DE0107
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

The deployment of each of the 86 IceCube strings lasted about 11 hours. In each one, 60 sensors (called DOMs) had to be quickly installed before the ice completely froze around them. (Courtesy: IceCube/NSF)

  • Image# DE0108
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

The IceCube Lab under the stars. The IceCube Laboratory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, in Antarctica, hosts the computers collecting raw data. Due to satellite bandwidth allocations, the first level of reconstruction and event filtering happens in near real time in this lab. Only events selected as interesting for physics studies are sent to UW–Madison, where they are prepared for used by any member of the IceCube Collaboration. (Courtesy: Felipe Pedreros, IceCube/NSF)

  • Image# DE0110
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

An aurora australis illuminates the IceCube Lab. The IceCube Laboratory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, in Antarctica, hosts the computers collecting raw data. Due to satellite bandwidth allocations, the first level of reconstruction and event filtering happens in near real time in this lab. Only events selected as interesting for physics studies are sent to UW–Madison, where they are prepared for used by any member of the IceCube Collaboration. (Courtesy: Keith Vanderlinde, IceCube/NSF)

  • Image# OT0166
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

Photomultiplier tubes capable of detecting as little as a single photon of light line the top and bottom of the LUX dark matter detector. They will record the position and intensity of collisions between dark matter particles and xenon nuclei. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0167
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

LUX researchers, seen here in a clean room on the surface at the Sanford Lab, work on the interior of the detector, before it is inserted into its titanium cryostat. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0168
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

White Teflon lines the interior of the LUX detector, to better gather faint signals of light that will be recorded by the photomultiplier tubes (center). (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0169
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX dark matter detector suspended in its protective water tank. The detector is a titanium cryostat—that is, a vacuum thermos—that will keep xenon cool enough to remain a liquid, at about minus 150 degrees F. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0170
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX co-spokespersons—Dan McKinsey, left, of Yale University and Rick Gaitskell of Brown University, pose on the top deck of the LUX experiment, 4,850 feet underground in the Sanford Lab. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# SL0106
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

Nanofabricated chips of fused silica just 3 millimeters long were used to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional particle accelerator technology. (Courtesy: Brad Plummer/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0107
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

The key to the accelerator chips is tiny, precisely spaced ridges, which cause the iridescence seen in this close-up photo. (Courtesy: Brad Plummer/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0108
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

The nanoscale patterns of SLAC and Stanford's accelerator on a chip gleam in rainbow colors prior to being assembled and cut into their final forms. (Courtesy: Matt Beardsley/SLAC)

  • Image# FN0425
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0426
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0421
  • FN
  • 09/02/2013

This image of the NGC 1398 galaxy was taken with the Dark Energy Camera. This galaxy lives in the Fornax cluster, roughly 65 million light years from Earth. It is 135,000 light years in diameter, just slightly larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, and contains more than a hundred million stars. (Courtesy: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# FN0423
  • FN
  • 09/02/2013

The Dark Energy Camera, mounted on the Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

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