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  • Image# SL0111
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The bottom part of this illustration shows the scale of the universe versus time. Specific events are shown such as the formation of neutral Hydrogen at 380 000 years after the big bang. Prior to this time, the constant interaction between matter (electrons) and light (photons) made the universe opaque. After this time, the photons we now call the CMB started streaming freely. The fluctuations (differences from place to place) in the matter distribution left their imprint on the CMB photons. The density waves appear as temperature and "E-mode" polarization. The gravitational waves leave a characteristic signature in the CMB polarization: the "B-modes". Both density and gravitational waves come from quantum fluctuations which have been magnified by inflation to be present at the time when the CMB photons were emitted. (Courtesy: SLAC)

  • Image# OT0166
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

Photomultiplier tubes capable of detecting as little as a single photon of light line the top and bottom of the LUX dark matter detector. They will record the position and intensity of collisions between dark matter particles and xenon nuclei. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0167
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

LUX researchers, seen here in a clean room on the surface at the Sanford Lab, work on the interior of the detector, before it is inserted into its titanium cryostat. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0168
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

White Teflon lines the interior of the LUX detector, to better gather faint signals of light that will be recorded by the photomultiplier tubes (center). (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0169
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX dark matter detector suspended in its protective water tank. The detector is a titanium cryostat—that is, a vacuum thermos—that will keep xenon cool enough to remain a liquid, at about minus 150 degrees F. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0170
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX co-spokespersons—Dan McKinsey, left, of Yale University and Rick Gaitskell of Brown University, pose on the top deck of the LUX experiment, 4,850 feet underground in the Sanford Lab. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# FN0425
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0426
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0421
  • FN
  • 09/02/2013

This image of the NGC 1398 galaxy was taken with the Dark Energy Camera. This galaxy lives in the Fornax cluster, roughly 65 million light years from Earth. It is 135,000 light years in diameter, just slightly larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, and contains more than a hundred million stars. (Courtesy: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# FN0423
  • FN
  • 09/02/2013

The Dark Energy Camera, mounted on the Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# OT0163
  • OT
  • 07/31/2013

M 31 captured by Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) (Courtesy: HSC Project/NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0164
  • OT
  • 07/31/2013

The image shows the position of HSC (without Filter Exchange Unit or FEU) when mounted on the inner, top ring of the Subaru Telescope. (Courtesy: NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0165
  • OT
  • 07/31/2013

A close-up of the top part of HSC with the FEU installed on it. (Courtesy: ASIAA)

  • Image# SL0102
  • SL
  • 02/14/2013

When stars explode, the supernovas send off shock waves like the one shown in this artist's rendition, which accelerate protons to cosmic-ray energies through a process known as Fermi acceleration. (Credit: Greg Stewart / SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0103
  • SL
  • 02/14/2013

This image combines data from ESA's Herschel Space Observatory with Fermi's gamma-ray observations (magenta) of supernova remnant W44. This remnant is a prime example of the remains of a supernova interacting with dense interstellar material around it and was one of two supernova remnants that provided the data Fermi needed to prove that cosmic rays are accelerated in supernova shock waves. (Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and ESA/Herschel)

  • Image# SL0104
  • SL
  • 02/14/2013

In order to understand the origin and acceleration of cosmic-ray protons, researchers used data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and targeted W44 and IC 443, two supernova remnants thousands of light years away. Both turned out to be strong sources of gamma rays, but not at energies below what neutral pion decay would produce - the observational proof scientists had been looking for. (Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration)

  • Image# SL0105
  • SL
  • 02/14/2013

Finding evidence for the acceleration of protons has long been a key issue in the efforts to explain the origin of cosmic rays. This pair of spectra from two supernova remnants, shown here with data from various satellites and wavelengths, are the "smoking gun" that researchers have been looking for. The Fermi Large Area Telescope's observations fit neatly with predictions of neutral pion decay. (Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, Chandra X-ray Observatory, ESA Herschel/XMM-Newton)

  • Image# OT0158
  • OT
  • 12/07/2012

IKAROS Spacecraft (Courtesy: JAXA)

  • Image# LB0055
  • LB
  • 12/04/2012

The BigBOSS proposal adds a new widefield, prime-focus corrector to the Mayall 4-meter telescope. A focal array with 5,000 optical fibers, individually positioned by robotic actuators, delivers light to a set of 10 three-arm spectrometers. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Background photo Mark Duggan)

  • Image# LB0054
  • LB
  • 08/07/2012

BOSS is capturing accurate spectra for millions of astronomical objects by using 2,000 plug plates that are placed at the Sloan Foundation Telescope's focal plane. Each of the 1,000 holes drilled in a single plug plate captures the light from a specific galaxy, quasar, or other target, and conveys its light to a sensitive spectrograph through an optical fiber. The plates are marked to indicate which holes belong to which bundles of the thousand optical fibers that carry the object's light. (Courtesy: Berkeley Lab)

  • Image# SL0101
  • SL
  • 07/18/2012

An artist's rendering of the proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. The 8.4-meter LSST will use a special three-mirror design, creating an exceptionally wide field of view and will have the ability to survey the entire sky in only three nights. (Courtesy: LSST Corporation)

  • Image# OT0125
  • OT
  • 02/13/2012

IPMU - The two images illustrate the effect of gravitational lensing. A massive galaxy at the center of the right panel causes the images of the background galaxies (white spots) to be enlarged and brightened. (Courtesy: Joerg Colberg, Ryan Scranton, Robert Lupton, SDSS, http://www.sdss.org/news/releases/20050426.magnification.html)

  • Image# OT0126
  • OT
  • 02/13/2012

The surface mass density as a function of distance (in units of a hundred thousand light-years). The blue points are observational data, whereas the solid line is the result of a computer simulation. The contributions from the central galaxy (red line) and from nearby galaxies (dashed line) are also shown. (Courtesy: IPMU)

  • Image# OT0127
  • OT
  • 02/13/2012

A computer simulation shows dark matter is distributed in a clumpy but organized manner. In the figure, high density regions appear bright whereas dark regions are nearly, but not completely, empty. (Courtesy: IPMU)

  • Image# CE0289
  • CE
  • 07/28/2011

view of the RFQ - RFQ of the ASACUSA experiment. It allows to slow down antiprotons coming from the AD from 5 MeV to 100 KeV with high efficiency. (Courtesy: CERN)

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