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  • Image# LB0059
  • LB
  • 07/14/2016

This is one slice through the map of the large-scale structure of the Universe from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Each dot in this picture indicates the position of a galaxy 6 billion years into the past. The image covers about 1/20th of the sky, a slice of the Universe 6 billion light-years wide, 4.5 billion light-years high, and 500 million light-years thick. Color indicates distance from Earth, ranging from yellow on the near side of the slice to purple on the far side. Galaxies are highly clustered, revealing superclusters and voids whose presence is seeded in the first fraction of a second after the Big Bang. This image contains 48,741 galaxies, about 3% of the full survey dataset. Grey patches are small regions without survey data. (Image credit: Daniel Eisenstein and the SDSS-III collaboration)

  • Image# LB0060
  • LB
  • 07/14/2016

The rectangle on the far left shows a cutout of 1000 sq. degrees in the sky containing nearly 120,000 galaxies, or roughly 10% of the total survey. The spectroscopic measurements of each galaxy — every dot in that cutout — transform the two-dimensional picture into a three-dimensional map, extending our view out to 7 billion years in the past. The brighter regions in this map correspond to the regions of the Universe with more galaxies and therefore more dark matter. The extra matter in those regions creates an excess gravitational pull, which makes the map a test of Einstein’s theory of gravity. (Image credit: Jeremy Tinker and the SDSS-III collaboration)

  • Image# FN0444
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

Spiral galaxy NGC 0895 is located in the constellation Cetus, about 110 million light-years from Earth. This image was taken with the Dark Energy Camera, the primary research tool of the Dark Energy Survey, which just began its second year of cataloging deep space. (Photo: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# FN0443
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

This image of the NGC 1398 galaxy was taken with the Dark Energy Camera. This galaxy lives in the Fornax cluster, roughly 65 million light-years from Earth. It is 135,000 light-years in diameter, just slightly larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, and contains more than 100 billion stars. (Credit: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# FN0442
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

Stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, which houses the Dark Energy Camera in Chile. (Credit: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0445
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

The large spiral galaxy in the center of this image is roughly 385 million light-years from Earth. This image was captured with the Dark Energy Camera as part of the first year of the Dark Energy Survey. The camera can see 8 billion light-years into deep space. (Photo: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# BN0054
  • BN
  • 07/09/2014

Training Tomorrow's Nuclear Chemistry Experts Each summer, college students have the opportunity to learn all that the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has to teach about a vital but often overlooked area of chemistry—one that spans everything from nuclear reactors and the safe handling of nuclear material to hospital diagnostic tools and cutting-edge medical research. Sponsored by the DOE and the American Chemical Society, the Summer School in Nuclear and Radiochemistry is entering its thirtieth year instructing some of the country’s best and brightest undergraduates in all things nuclear science. Here students visit the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL).

  • Image# SL0111
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The bottom part of this illustration shows the scale of the universe versus time. Specific events are shown such as the formation of neutral Hydrogen at 380 000 years after the big bang. Prior to this time, the constant interaction between matter (electrons) and light (photons) made the universe opaque. After this time, the photons we now call the CMB started streaming freely. The fluctuations (differences from place to place) in the matter distribution left their imprint on the CMB photons. The density waves appear as temperature and "E-mode" polarization. The gravitational waves leave a characteristic signature in the CMB polarization: the "B-modes". Both density and gravitational waves come from quantum fluctuations which have been magnified by inflation to be present at the time when the CMB photons were emitted. (Courtesy: SLAC)

  • Image# BE0011
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

Workers from the China Railway 15th Bureau Group Corporation (CR15G) drill at the foot of the Paiya Mountain for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0012
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

192 8-inch photomultiplier tubes were mounted on ladders installed along the inner wall of the stainless steel vessel for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0016
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

This photo shows the desktop commissioning of the high energy X-ray telescope onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT), a planned X-ray space observatory. The spacecraft is planned for launch between 2014 and 2016. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0017
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

This artistic impression shows the planned X-ray space observatory Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) in orbit. The spacecraft is planned for launch between 2014 and 2016. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0008
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

On October 19, 2012, all of the eight anti-neutrino detectors of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment were successfully installed and started to take data. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0009
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

No.1 Experimental Hall at Daya Bay. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0010
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

No.2 Experimental Hall at Daya Bay. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0013
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

The Yangbajing International Cosmic Ray Observatory, shown here, has hosted the Tibet ASγ Experiment (Sino-Japanese Cooperation) since 1990. After 6 years’ preparation, the ARGO-YBJ Project (Sino-Italian Cooperation) started its detector installation in 2000. Both experiments aim to determine the origin of high-energy cosmic rays, high-energy gamma-ray bursts, the correlation between the movement of the cosmic ray sun shadow and the solar/interplanetary magnetic field and solar activity. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0015
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

The Tibet-II ASγ array, located at the Yangbajing International Cosmic Ray Observatory, aims to determine the origin of high-energy cosmic rays, high energy gamma-ray bursts, the correlation between the movement of the cosmic ray sun shadow and the solar/interplanetary magnetic field and solar activity. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# OT0166
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

Photomultiplier tubes capable of detecting as little as a single photon of light line the top and bottom of the LUX dark matter detector. They will record the position and intensity of collisions between dark matter particles and xenon nuclei. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0167
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

LUX researchers, seen here in a clean room on the surface at the Sanford Lab, work on the interior of the detector, before it is inserted into its titanium cryostat. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0168
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

White Teflon lines the interior of the LUX detector, to better gather faint signals of light that will be recorded by the photomultiplier tubes (center). (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0169
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX dark matter detector suspended in its protective water tank. The detector is a titanium cryostat—that is, a vacuum thermos—that will keep xenon cool enough to remain a liquid, at about minus 150 degrees F. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0170
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX co-spokespersons—Dan McKinsey, left, of Yale University and Rick Gaitskell of Brown University, pose on the top deck of the LUX experiment, 4,850 feet underground in the Sanford Lab. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# FN0425
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0426
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0421
  • FN
  • 09/02/2013

This image of the NGC 1398 galaxy was taken with the Dark Energy Camera. This galaxy lives in the Fornax cluster, roughly 65 million light years from Earth. It is 135,000 light years in diameter, just slightly larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, and contains more than a hundred million stars. (Courtesy: Dark Energy Survey)

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