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  • Image# CE0353
  • CE
  • 07/27/2015

Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded (left). They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bound together. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# CE0354
  • CE
  • 07/27/2015

Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded (left). They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bound together. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# OT0173
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Structure of a pion (left) and a SIMP (strongly interacting massive particle) proposed by Hochberg et al. (right). (Credit: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0174
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Conventional theories predict that dark matter particles would not collide, rather they would slip past one another (above). Hochberg et al. predicts dark matter SIMPs would collide and interact with one another (below). (Credit: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0176
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Authors (from left to right): University of California Berkeley postdoc Yonit Hochberg, Cornell University researcher Eric Kuflik, Kavli IPMU director Hitoshi Murayama, Tel Aviv University Professor Tomer Volansky, and Stanford University assistant professor Jay Wacker.(Credit:Yonit Hochberg, Eric Kuflik, Kavli IPMU, Tomer Volansky, Jay G. Wacker)

  • Image# CE0349
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the ALICE detector (Image: ALICE)

  • Image# CE0352
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the LHCb detector (Image: LHCb)

  • Image# FN0460
  • FN
  • 01/15/2015

Spoke Test Cryostat (STC) at Meson Test Cave. People: Leonardo Ristori. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# ST0031
  • ST
  • 12/18/2014

An overview of how the LHC at CERN can look for dark matter. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0114
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. The simulation shown here depicts two electron bunches - containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each – that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0446
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

A Fermilab scientist works on the laser beams at the heart of the Holometer experiment. The Holometer will use twin laser interferometers to test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab

  • Image# FN0447
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

Fermilab scientist Aaron Chou, left, project manager for the Holometer experiment, with the device that will test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0448
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

A close-up of the Holometer at Fermilab, an experiment designed to test the information storage capacity of the universe, and determine whether we live in a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0449
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

Top view of the Holometer as a Fermilab scientist works on the apparatus. The Holometer uses twin laser interferometers to look for "holographic noise" in space-time, and will test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0450
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

The holometer as constructed at Fermilab includes two interferometers in evacuated 6-inch steel tubes about 40 meters long. Optical systems (not shown here) in each one “recycle” laser light to create a very steady, intense laser wave with about a kilowatt of laser power to maximize the precision of the measurement. The outputs of the two photodiodes are correlated to measure the holographic jitter of the spacetime the two machines share. The holometer will measure jitter as small as a few billionths of a billionth of a meter. Illustration: Fermilab.

  • Image# ST0020
  • ST
  • 08/21/2014

UK scientists have built a new facility aimed at understanding how particles from space can interact with electronic devices, and to investigate the chaos that cosmic rays can cause – such as taking communications satellites offline, wiping a device's memory or affecting aircraft electronics. ChipIR has successfully completed its first round of development testing before going in to full operation in 2015. Pictured here is the CHIPIR build on 10 April 2014 (Credit: STFC)

  • Image# ST0021
  • ST
  • 08/21/2014

UK scientists have built a new facility aimed at understanding how particles from space can interact with electronic devices, and to investigate the chaos that cosmic rays can cause – such as taking communications satellites offline, wiping a device's memory or affecting aircraft electronics. ChipIR has successfully completed its first round of development testing before going in to full operation in 2015. Pictured here is Dr Chris Frost, ChipIR project scientist at ISIS. (Credit: STFC)

  • Image# FN0439
  • FN
  • 07/30/2014

The 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet at rest inside the Fermilab building that will house the experiment. The magnet was moved into the new building on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The magnet will allow scientists to precisely probe the properties of subatomic particles called muons. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0440
  • FN
  • 07/30/2014

Workers slowly slide the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet inside the new building on the Fermilab site that will house the experiment. The magnet was moved into the building on Wednesday, July 30, 2014, while a crowd of scientists and onlookers watched. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0441
  • FN
  • 07/30/2014

Exactly one year to the day after completing a 3,200-mile journey from Long Island, the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet was moved across the Fermilab site on Saturday, July 26 to the new building that will house the experiment. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0432
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The MicroBooNE detector is transported on a truck. Fermilab's Wilson Hall is in the background. The 30-ton neutrino detector was transported three miles across the Fermilab site on Monday, June 23, 2014, and placed in its new home in the Liquid-Argon Test Facility. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0433
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is slowly lowered through the open roof of the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab, where it will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment. Crews first took the roof of the building off with the massive crane, then lowered the detector into place. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0434
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is gently lowered into the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab on Monday, June 23, 2014. The detector will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment, which will study ghostly particles called neutrinos. (Photo: Fermilab.)

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