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  • Image# LB0060
  • LB
  • 07/14/2016

The rectangle on the far left shows a cutout of 1000 sq. degrees in the sky containing nearly 120,000 galaxies, or roughly 10% of the total survey. The spectroscopic measurements of each galaxy — every dot in that cutout — transform the two-dimensional picture into a three-dimensional map, extending our view out to 7 billion years in the past. The brighter regions in this map correspond to the regions of the Universe with more galaxies and therefore more dark matter. The extra matter in those regions creates an excess gravitational pull, which makes the map a test of Einstein’s theory of gravity. (Image credit: Jeremy Tinker and the SDSS-III collaboration)

  • Image# FN0484
  • FN
  • 02/18/2016

MicroBooNE neutrino event

  • Image# FN0483
  • FN
  • 11/17/2015

Maurice Ball working at CMTF on PXIE - Construction of the PXIE particle accelerator

  • Image# IN0056
  • IN
  • 11/11/2015

Hall B of LNGS with XENON installations: The building in front houses various auxiliary systems, the detector itself is installed inside the large water shield in the back. (Image: INFN)

  • Image# IN0057
  • IN
  • 11/11/2015

Assembly of the XENON1T TPC in the cleanroom. (Image: INFN)

  • Image# FN0482
  • FN
  • 10/08/2015

35-ton-capacity Prototype cryostat for LBNF / DUNE, Anode Plane Assemblies - Construction of the DUNE 35-ton prototype detector

  • Image# SL0116
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Simulation of high-energy positron acceleration in an ionized gas, or plasma – a new method that could help power next-generation particle colliders. The image shows the formation of a high-density plasma (green/orange color) around a positron beam moving from the bottom right to the top left. Plasma electrons pass by the positron beam on wave-like trajectories (lines). (W. An/UCLA)

  • Image# FN0480
  • FN
  • 08/17/2015

Cavity tuner for Booster particle accelerator

  • Image# FN0478
  • FN
  • 08/14/2015

The 300-ton NOvA neutrino detector at Fermilab

  • Image# FN0477
  • FN
  • 08/06/2015

CMS pixel detector work in the SiDet clean room - Construction of new pixel detector for CMS experiment

  • Image# FN0479
  • FN
  • 08/06/2015

Neutrinos can transform into one another, and so can quarks. What about muons and electrons? The Mu2e experiment will allow scientists to produce and capture muons, then search for signs that they convert into electrons. The Mu2e prototype magnet coil underwent testing in the Central Helium Liquefier at Fermilab.

  • Image# CE0353
  • CE
  • 07/27/2015

Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded (left). They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bound together. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# CE0354
  • CE
  • 07/27/2015

Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded (left). They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bound together. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# OT0173
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Structure of a pion (left) and a SIMP (strongly interacting massive particle) proposed by Hochberg et al. (right). (Credit: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0174
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Conventional theories predict that dark matter particles would not collide, rather they would slip past one another (above). Hochberg et al. predicts dark matter SIMPs would collide and interact with one another (below). (Credit: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0176
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Authors (from left to right): University of California Berkeley postdoc Yonit Hochberg, Cornell University researcher Eric Kuflik, Kavli IPMU director Hitoshi Murayama, Tel Aviv University Professor Tomer Volansky, and Stanford University assistant professor Jay Wacker.(Credit:Yonit Hochberg, Eric Kuflik, Kavli IPMU, Tomer Volansky, Jay G. Wacker)

  • Image# FN0475
  • FN
  • 07/22/2015

Minerba Betencourt working on MINERvA in the MINOS cavern - Photomultiplier tubes of the MINERvA neutrino experiment

  • Image# CE0349
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the ALICE detector (Image: ALICE)

  • Image# CE0352
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the LHCb detector (Image: LHCb)

  • Image# FN0473
  • FN
  • 05/12/2015

NOvA Neutrino Experiment 14,000-ton Far Detector at Ash River, MN

  • Image# FN0460
  • FN
  • 01/15/2015

Spoke Test Cryostat (STC) at Meson Test Cave. People: Leonardo Ristori. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# ST0031
  • ST
  • 12/18/2014

An overview of how the LHC at CERN can look for dark matter. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0114
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. The simulation shown here depicts two electron bunches - containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each – that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

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