< Back to Navigation

Interactions.org - Particle Physics News and Resources

A communication resource from the world's particle physics laboratories

231 Search Results

Sort By: Image # Lab Date  
  • Image# ST0031
  • ST
  • 12/18/2014

An overview of how the LHC at CERN can look for dark matter. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0022
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Supersymmetric particles family: A rare glimpse of all the normal particles and their secret 'super' selves. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0023
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Dark matter iceberg: Dark matter, dark energy and normal matter make up the Universe, but we can only see one of them. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0024
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

A supersymmetry particle: Supersymmetry theory says that every particle has a 'super' equivalent that is more massive. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0025
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Antimatter handshake: When matter and antimatter meet, they annihilate (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0026
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Higgs boson poster: What do we know about the Higgs Boson? What do we still want to know? (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0027
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Matter inside a detector. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0028
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

LHC at CERN illustration (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0029
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Explaining Supersymmetry: What is supersymmetry? What does it predict?(Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0030
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Dark matter iceberg: The proportions of matter, dark matter and dark energy scientists' theories say make up the Universe. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# SL0114
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. The simulation shown here depicts two electron bunches - containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each – that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# OT0172
  • OT
  • 03/19/2014

This graphic shows the four individual top quark mass measurements published by the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations, together with the joint and most precise measurement obtained in a joint analysis. The ATLAS and CMS experiment recorded top quark events using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the CDF and DZero experiments recorded top quark events using the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Image courtesy ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations. (Credit: CERN/Fermilab)

  • Image# SL0111
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The bottom part of this illustration shows the scale of the universe versus time. Specific events are shown such as the formation of neutral Hydrogen at 380 000 years after the big bang. Prior to this time, the constant interaction between matter (electrons) and light (photons) made the universe opaque. After this time, the photons we now call the CMB started streaming freely. The fluctuations (differences from place to place) in the matter distribution left their imprint on the CMB photons. The density waves appear as temperature and "E-mode" polarization. The gravitational waves leave a characteristic signature in the CMB polarization: the "B-modes". Both density and gravitational waves come from quantum fluctuations which have been magnified by inflation to be present at the time when the CMB photons were emitted. (Courtesy: SLAC)

  • Image# FN0428
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A graphic representation of one of the first neutrino interactions captured at the NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The dotted red line represents the neutrino beam, generated at Fermilab in Illinois and sent through 500 miles of earth to the far detector. The image on the left is a simplified 3-D view of the detector, the top right view shows the interaction from the top of the detector, and the bottom right view shows the interaction from the side of the detector. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

  • Image# CE0341
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

A schematic drawing of the Cusp Trap scheme. From left to right: the cusp trap to produce antihydrogen atoms, a microwave cavity (green) to induce hyperfine transitions, a sextupole magnet (red and grey), and an antihydrogen detector (gold). (Crourtesy: Stefan Meyer Institut.)

  • Image# LB0058
  • LB
  • 01/08/2014

An artist's conception of the measurement scale of the universe. Baryon acoustic oscillations are the tendency of galaxies and other matter to cluster in spheres, which originated as density waves traveling through the plasma of the early universe. The clustering is greatly exaggerated in this illustration. The radius of the spheres (white line) is the scale of a “standard ruler” allowing astronomers to determine, within one percent accuracy, the large-scale structure of the universe and how it has evolved. (Courtesy: Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

  • Image# DE0107
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

The deployment of each of the 86 IceCube strings lasted about 11 hours. In each one, 60 sensors (called DOMs) had to be quickly installed before the ice completely froze around them. (Courtesy: IceCube/NSF)

  • Image# DE0108
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

The IceCube Lab under the stars. The IceCube Laboratory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, in Antarctica, hosts the computers collecting raw data. Due to satellite bandwidth allocations, the first level of reconstruction and event filtering happens in near real time in this lab. Only events selected as interesting for physics studies are sent to UW–Madison, where they are prepared for used by any member of the IceCube Collaboration. (Courtesy: Felipe Pedreros, IceCube/NSF)

  • Image# DE0109
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

This is the highest energy neutrino ever observed, with an estimated energy of 1.14 PeV. It was detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole on January 3, 2012. IceCube physicists named it Ernie. (Courtesy: IceCube Collaboration)

  • Image# OT0161
  • OT
  • 06/12/2013

Render of International Linear Collider - Next-generation particle accelerator (Courtesy: Rey.Hori/KEK)

  • Image# OT0162
  • OT
  • 06/12/2013

International Linear Collider conceptual diagram - Next-generation particle accelerator (Courtesy: ILC GDE)

  • Image# FN0417
  • FN
  • 05/08/2013

A model of the truck that will be used to transport the Muon g-2 ring, placed on a streetscape for scale. The truck will be escorted by police and other vehicles when it moves from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to a barge, and then from the barge to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

  • Image# OT0159
  • OT
  • 04/23/2013

The light curve of PS1-10afx compared to a normal SNIa. The blue dots show the observations of PS1-10afx through a red (i-band) filter, which corresponds to ultra-violet (UV) light in the rest frame of the supernova. The red squares show UV observations of the nearby SNIa, 2011fe compressed slightly along the time axis to match the width of PS1-10afx in its rest frame. The dashed lines show a fit to the SN 2011fe data and this same curve shifted by a constant factor of 30. The good agreement with the PS1-10afx data shows that PS1-10afx has the lightcurve shape of a normal SNIa, but it is 30 times brighter than expected. (Courtesy: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0160
  • OT
  • 04/23/2013

Schematic illustration of the magnification of PS1-10afx. A massive object between us and the supernova bends light rays much as a glass lens can focus light. As more light rays are directed toward the observer than would be without the lens, the supernova appears magnified. (Courtesy: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# FN0412
  • FN
  • 03/28/2013

This 3D image shows a cosmic-ray muon producing a large shower of energy as it passes through the NOvA far detector in Minnesota. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

Page 1 of 10

Images from the Interactions.org website may be downloaded, reproduced and published free of charge for use in newspapers, online news sites, educational materials and websites, and other not-for-profit educational outlets. For other uses, please request permission. All the images from the Interactions.org image bank are the property of the contributing organizations. The credit line accompanying each photo must appear, as listed, in the publication.