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  • Image# FN0458
  • FN
  • 01/08/2015

Tevatron magnets being moved from the Magnet Storage Building to the Railhead Yard. Photographer: Reidar Hahn

  • Image# SL0110
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The Dark Sector Lab (DSL), located 3/4 of a mile from the Geographic South Pole, houses the BICEP2 telescope (left) and the South Pole Telescope (right). (Courtesy: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)

  • Image# SL0111
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The bottom part of this illustration shows the scale of the universe versus time. Specific events are shown such as the formation of neutral Hydrogen at 380 000 years after the big bang. Prior to this time, the constant interaction between matter (electrons) and light (photons) made the universe opaque. After this time, the photons we now call the CMB started streaming freely. The fluctuations (differences from place to place) in the matter distribution left their imprint on the CMB photons. The density waves appear as temperature and "E-mode" polarization. The gravitational waves leave a characteristic signature in the CMB polarization: the "B-modes". Both density and gravitational waves come from quantum fluctuations which have been magnified by inflation to be present at the time when the CMB photons were emitted. (Courtesy: SLAC)

  • Image# BE0001
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

On the early morning of November 18, 2006, the first electron beam was successfully accumulated in the storage ring of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider II. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0011
  • BE
  • 03/01/2014

Workers from the China Railway 15th Bureau Group Corporation (CR15G) drill at the foot of the Paiya Mountain for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0007
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

In November 2007, the installation of the Beijing Spectrometer III was completed. This group photo was taken just after the installation. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# BE0008
  • BE
  • 11/01/2013

On October 19, 2012, all of the eight anti-neutrino detectors of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment were successfully installed and started to take data. (Image credit: Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Image# SL0102
  • SL
  • 02/14/2013

When stars explode, the supernovas send off shock waves like the one shown in this artist's rendition, which accelerate protons to cosmic-ray energies through a process known as Fermi acceleration. (Credit: Greg Stewart / SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# GN0017
  • GS
  • 07/18/2012

XENON100 (Courtesy: XENON Collaboration)

  • Image# CE0314
  • CE
  • 07/06/2012

Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons. (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice)

  • Image# CE0315
  • CE
  • 07/06/2012

Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons. (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice)

  • Image# CE0303
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Rolf Heuer at CERN Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0302
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Higgs Boson search update - 4 July 2012 (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0305
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Joe Incandela, CERN spokesperson for Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0306
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

John Ellis, Higgs Boson search update at CERN (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0307
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS experiment spokesperson, at Higgs Boson search update at CERN (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0308
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Peter Higgs, Higgs Boson search update at CERN (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0309
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

A proton-proton collision event in the CMS experiment producing two high-energy photons (red towers). This is what we would expect to see from the decay of a Higgs boson but it is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# CE0310
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Francois Englert, Higgs Boson search update at CERN (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0311
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Francois Englert and Peter Higgs, Higgs Boson search update at CERN, 4 July 2012 (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

  • Image# CE0320
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Event recorded with the CMS detector in 2012 at a proton-proton centre of mass energy of 8 TeV. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of the SM Higgs boson to a pair of photons (dashed yellow lines and green towers). The event could also be due to known standard model background processes. (Courtesy: Taylor, L.)

  • Image# CE0318
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

On 4 July, 2012, the ATLAS experiment presented a preview of its updated results on the search for the Higgs Boson. The results were shown at a seminar held jointly at CERN and via video link at ICHEP, the International Conference for High Energy Physics in Melbourne, Australia, where detailed analyses will be presented later this week. More information at www.atlas.ch (Courtesy: ATLAS, collaboration )

  • Image# CE0319
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

On 4 July, 2012, the ATLAS experiment presented a preview of its updated results on the search for the Higgs Boson. The results were shown at a seminar held jointly at CERN and via video link at ICHEP, the International Conference for High Energy Physics in Melbourne, Australia, where detailed analyses will be presented later this week. More information at www.atlas.ch (Courtesy: ATLAS, collaboration )

  • Image# CE0323
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Event display of a H -> 2e2mu candidate event with m(4l) = 122.6 (123.9) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 87.9 GeV and 19.6 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-Jun-2012, 11:07:47 CEST in run number 205113 as event number 12611816. Muon tracks are colored red, electron tracks and clusters in the LAr calorimeter are colored green. The larger inset shows a zoom into the tracking detector. The smaller inset shows a zoom into the vertex region, indicating that the 4 leptons originate from the same primary vertex. (Courtesy: ATLAS, Collaboration)

  • Image# CE0324
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Event display of a H -> 2e2mu candidate event with m(4l) = 122.6 (123.9) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 87.9 GeV and 19.6 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-Jun-2012, 11:07:47 CEST in run number 205113 as event number 12611816. Zoom into the tracking detector. Muon tracks are colored red, electron tracks and clusters in the LAr calorimeter are colored green. (Courtesy: ATLAS, Collaboration)

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