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  • Image# CE0353
  • CE
  • 07/27/2015

Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded (left). They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bound together. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# CE0354
  • CE
  • 07/27/2015

Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded (left). They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bound together. (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# OT0173
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Structure of a pion (left) and a SIMP (strongly interacting massive particle) proposed by Hochberg et al. (right). (Credit: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0174
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Conventional theories predict that dark matter particles would not collide, rather they would slip past one another (above). Hochberg et al. predicts dark matter SIMPs would collide and interact with one another (below). (Credit: Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# OT0175
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Artist's impression of dark matter distribution. Left image assumes conventional dark matter theories, where dark matter would be highly peaked in small area in galaxy center. Right image assumes SIMPs, where dark matter in galaxy would spread out from the center. (Original credit: NASA, STScI; Credit: Kavli IPMU - Kavli IPMU modified this figure based on the image credited by NASA, STScI)

  • Image# OT0176
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Authors (from left to right): University of California Berkeley postdoc Yonit Hochberg, Cornell University researcher Eric Kuflik, Kavli IPMU director Hitoshi Murayama, Tel Aviv University Professor Tomer Volansky, and Stanford University assistant professor Jay Wacker.(Credit:Yonit Hochberg, Eric Kuflik, Kavli IPMU, Tomer Volansky, Jay G. Wacker)

  • Image# OT0177
  • OT
  • 07/22/2015

Hitoshi Murayama: Kavli IPMU Director (Credit:Kavli IPMU)

  • Image# CE0349
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the ALICE detector (Image: ALICE)

  • Image# CE0350
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the ATLAS detector (Image: ATLAS)

  • Image# CE0351
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the CMS detector (Image: CMS)

  • Image# CE0352
  • CE
  • 05/21/2015

Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the LHCb detector (Image: LHCb)

  • Image# ST0031
  • ST
  • 12/18/2014

An overview of how the LHC at CERN can look for dark matter. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0022
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Supersymmetric particles family: A rare glimpse of all the normal particles and their secret 'super' selves. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0023
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Dark matter iceberg: Dark matter, dark energy and normal matter make up the Universe, but we can only see one of them. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0024
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

A supersymmetry particle: Supersymmetry theory says that every particle has a 'super' equivalent that is more massive. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0025
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Antimatter handshake: When matter and antimatter meet, they annihilate (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0026
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Higgs boson poster: What do we know about the Higgs Boson? What do we still want to know? (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0027
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Matter inside a detector. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0028
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

LHC at CERN illustration (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0029
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Explaining Supersymmetry: What is supersymmetry? What does it predict?(Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# ST0030
  • ST
  • 12/12/2014

Dark matter iceberg: The proportions of matter, dark matter and dark energy scientists' theories say make up the Universe. (Credit: STFC/Ben Gilliland)

  • Image# CE0348
  • CE
  • 11/05/2014

Fabiola Gianotti with incumbent Director-General Rolf Heuer (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN)

  • Image# CE0347
  • CE
  • 11/05/2014

Fabiola Gianotti, pictured here at the ATLAS detector, will be CERN's next Director-General. Her five-year mandate will begin on 1 January 2016 (Image: Claudia Marcelloni/CERN)

  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

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