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  • Image# FN0432
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The MicroBooNE detector is transported on a truck. Fermilab's Wilson Hall is in the background. The 30-ton neutrino detector was transported three miles across the Fermilab site on Monday, June 23, 2014, and placed in its new home in the Liquid-Argon Test Facility. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0433
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is slowly lowered through the open roof of the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab, where it will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment. Crews first took the roof of the building off with the massive crane, then lowered the detector into place. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0434
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is gently lowered into the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab on Monday, June 23, 2014. The detector will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment, which will study ghostly particles called neutrinos. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0435
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The massive MicroBooNE neutrino detector is gently lowered into the main cavern of the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab on Monday, June 23, 2014. The banner on the side reads "MicroBooNE – Driving Nu Physics." The Greek letter nu stands for neutrinos, the subatomic particles that the experiment will study. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0436
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE detector in its cradle in the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab. The detector, which contains a time projection chamber that includes 8,256 delicate gilded wires, was carefully transported three miles across the Fermilab site and lowered into place with a massive crane on Monday, June 23, 2014. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0437
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The MicroBooNE detector is at rest in its new home, Fermilab's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. The detector is now in the path of Fermilab's intense neutrino beam and will begin taking data later this year. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0438
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector was transported across the Fermilab site on Monday, June 23, 2014. The banner on the side reads "MicroBooNE – Driving Nu Physics." The Greek letter nu (pronounced "new") stands for subatomic particles called neutrinos. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# CE0344
  • CE
  • 06/12/2014

Overall view of the LHC, including the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments. (Image: CERN)

  • Image# CE0345
  • CE
  • 06/12/2014

Overall view of the LHC. View of the 4 LHC detectors: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. (Image: CERN)

  • Image# CE0346
  • CE
  • 05/15/2014

Italian particle physicist Fabiola Gianotti, a former spokesperson of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. (Image: CERN)

  • Image# JL0035
  • JL
  • 05/13/2014

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has achieved the final two accelerator commissioning milestones needed to start experimental operations following its first major upgrade. In the early hours of May 7, 2014, the machine delivered its highest-energy beams ever, 10.5 billion electron-volts through the entire accelerator and up to the start of the beamline for its newest experimental complex, Hall D. Then, in the last minutes of the day on May 7, the machine delivered beam, for the first time, into Hall D. This photo shows the new beamline rising 5 meters before entering the Hall D complex. (Photo: Jefferson Lab.)

  • Image# BN0051
  • BN
  • 04/10/2014

The STAR detector at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As big as a house, STAR searches for signatures of the form of matter that RHIC aims to create: the quark-gluon plasma. Shown here is the central portion of the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) being installed at the STAR detector. The HFT will track particles made of "charm" and "beauty" quarks, rare varieties (or "flavors") that are more massive than the lighter "up" and "down" quarks that make up ordinary matter. The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) is a detector which specializes in tracking the thousands of particles produced by each ion collision at RHIC. Weighing 1,200 tons and as large as a house, STAR is a massive detector. It is used to search for signatures of the form of matter that RHIC was designed to create: the quark-gluon plasma. It is also used to investigate the behavior of matter at high energy densities by making measurements over a large area. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# OT0172
  • OT
  • 03/19/2014

This graphic shows the four individual top quark mass measurements published by the ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations, together with the joint and most precise measurement obtained in a joint analysis. The ATLAS and CMS experiment recorded top quark events using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the CDF and DZero experiments recorded top quark events using the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Image courtesy ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero collaborations. (Credit: CERN/Fermilab)

  • Image# SL0110
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The Dark Sector Lab (DSL), located 3/4 of a mile from the Geographic South Pole, houses the BICEP2 telescope (left) and the South Pole Telescope (right). (Courtesy: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)

  • Image# SL0111
  • SL
  • 03/17/2014

The bottom part of this illustration shows the scale of the universe versus time. Specific events are shown such as the formation of neutral Hydrogen at 380 000 years after the big bang. Prior to this time, the constant interaction between matter (electrons) and light (photons) made the universe opaque. After this time, the photons we now call the CMB started streaming freely. The fluctuations (differences from place to place) in the matter distribution left their imprint on the CMB photons. The density waves appear as temperature and "E-mode" polarization. The gravitational waves leave a characteristic signature in the CMB polarization: the "B-modes". Both density and gravitational waves come from quantum fluctuations which have been magnified by inflation to be present at the time when the CMB photons were emitted. (Courtesy: SLAC)

  • Image# FN0427
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A view of the top of the nearly completed NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The detector is made up of 28 PVC blocks, each weighing 417,000 pounds, and spans 51 feet by 51 feet by 200 feet. When it is completed and filled with liquid scintillator, the far detector will weigh 14,000 tons. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# FN0428
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A graphic representation of one of the first neutrino interactions captured at the NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The dotted red line represents the neutrino beam, generated at Fermilab in Illinois and sent through 500 miles of earth to the far detector. The image on the left is a simplified 3-D view of the detector, the top right view shows the interaction from the top of the detector, and the bottom right view shows the interaction from the side of the detector. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0429
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014, with the nearly completed detector in the background. Each block of the detector measures about 50 feet by 50 feet by 6 feet and is made up of 384 plastic PVC modules, assembled flat on a massive pivoting machine. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# BN0047
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

A welder works on the first superconducting radiofrequency cavity installed at RHIC. Superconductivity allows the cavity to operate at higher voltage than conventional cavities, thus producing a stronger focusing force for ion beams. After commissioning, the cavity should further increase RHIC's collision rates. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0048
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

At the heart of the PHENIX detector (top), a silicon vertex tracker (green layers behind the "X" shaped black structure in bottom image) surrounds the point where collisions take place. Together with forward silicon vertex trackers at each end of the barrel (one being adjusted by technician Mike Lenz), these components identify and count the decay products of particles made of heavy quarks streaming out of RHIC collisions. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0049
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

Technician Mike Myers checks components of stochastic cooling "kickers," which generate electric fields to nudge ions in RHIC's gold beams back into tightly packed bunches. This system of squeezing and cooling beams has produced dramatic increases in collision rates—and the data coming out of RHIC. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0050
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

The central portion of the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) being installed at RHIC's STAR detector (top), and the surrounding portion before installation (bottom). The HFT will track particles made of "charm" and "beauty" quarks, rare varieties (or "flavors") that are more massive than the lighter "up" and "down" quarks that make up ordinary matter. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# CE0340
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

ASACUSA (Courtesy: Yasunori, Yamakazi)

  • Image# CE0341
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

A schematic drawing of the Cusp Trap scheme. From left to right: the cusp trap to produce antihydrogen atoms, a microwave cavity (green) to induce hyperfine transitions, a sextupole magnet (red and grey), and an antihydrogen detector (gold). (Crourtesy: Stefan Meyer Institut.)

  • Image# CE0342
  • CE
  • 01/21/2014

Electrostatic protocol treatment lens. The purpose of this device is to transport Antiprotons from the new ELENA storage beam to all AD experiments. The electrostatic device was successfully tested in ASACUSA two weeks ago. (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice)

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