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  • Image# LB0059
  • LB
  • 07/14/2016

This is one slice through the map of the large-scale structure of the Universe from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Each dot in this picture indicates the position of a galaxy 6 billion years into the past. The image covers about 1/20th of the sky, a slice of the Universe 6 billion light-years wide, 4.5 billion light-years high, and 500 million light-years thick. Color indicates distance from Earth, ranging from yellow on the near side of the slice to purple on the far side. Galaxies are highly clustered, revealing superclusters and voids whose presence is seeded in the first fraction of a second after the Big Bang. This image contains 48,741 galaxies, about 3% of the full survey dataset. Grey patches are small regions without survey data. (Image credit: Daniel Eisenstein and the SDSS-III collaboration)

  • Image# LB0060
  • LB
  • 07/14/2016

The rectangle on the far left shows a cutout of 1000 sq. degrees in the sky containing nearly 120,000 galaxies, or roughly 10% of the total survey. The spectroscopic measurements of each galaxy — every dot in that cutout — transform the two-dimensional picture into a three-dimensional map, extending our view out to 7 billion years in the past. The brighter regions in this map correspond to the regions of the Universe with more galaxies and therefore more dark matter. The extra matter in those regions creates an excess gravitational pull, which makes the map a test of Einstein’s theory of gravity. (Image credit: Jeremy Tinker and the SDSS-III collaboration)

  • Image# TR0013
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Zeynab Nosrati, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

  • Image# TR0015
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Zeynab Nosrati, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

  • Image# TR0016
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Zeynab Nosrati, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

  • Image# TR0017
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Zeynab Nosrati, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

  • Image# TR0018
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Jessie Fu, Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Image# TR0019
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Jessie Fu, Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Image# TR0020
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Jessie Fu & Andrew Robertson, Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Image# TR0022
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Andrew Roberson, Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Image# TR0023
  • TR
  • 05/12/2016

Andrew Roberson, Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Image# TR009
  • TR
  • 05/11/2016

Andrew Finlay, Department of Physics & Astronomy

  • Image# TR0021
  • TR
  • 05/11/2016

Ryan McFadden, Department of Chemistry

  • Image# FN0484
  • FN
  • 02/18/2016

MicroBooNE neutrino event

  • Image# FN0483
  • FN
  • 11/17/2015

Maurice Ball working at CMTF on PXIE - Construction of the PXIE particle accelerator

  • Image# IN0056
  • IN
  • 11/11/2015

Hall B of LNGS with XENON installations: The building in front houses various auxiliary systems, the detector itself is installed inside the large water shield in the back. (Image: INFN)

  • Image# IN0057
  • IN
  • 11/11/2015

Assembly of the XENON1T TPC in the cleanroom. (Image: INFN)

  • Image# FN0482
  • FN
  • 10/08/2015

35-ton-capacity Prototype cryostat for LBNF / DUNE, Anode Plane Assemblies - Construction of the DUNE 35-ton prototype detector

  • Image# FN0481
  • FN
  • 09/25/2015

SRF 2015 Student Competition Winner Mattia Checchin works on a superconducting RF particle accelerator cavity

  • Image# SL0115
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Future particle colliders will require highly efficient acceleration methods for both electrons and positrons. Plasma wakefield acceleration of both particle types, as shown in this simulation, could lead to smaller and more powerful colliders than today’s machines. (F. Tsung/W. An/UCLA/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0116
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Simulation of high-energy positron acceleration in an ionized gas, or plasma – a new method that could help power next-generation particle colliders. The image shows the formation of a high-density plasma (green/orange color) around a positron beam moving from the bottom right to the top left. Plasma electrons pass by the positron beam on wave-like trajectories (lines). (W. An/UCLA)

  • Image# SL0117
  • SL
  • 08/26/2015

Computer simulations of the interaction of electrons (left, red areas) and positrons (right, red areas) with a plasma. The approximate locations of tightly packed bundles of particles, or bunches, are within the dashed lines. Left: For electrons, a drive bunch (on the right) generates a plasma wake (white area) on which a trailing electron bunch (on the left) gains energy. Right: For positrons, a single bunch can interact with the plasma in such a way that the front of the bunch generates a wake that accelerates the bunch tail. (W. An/UCLA)

  • Image# FN0480
  • FN
  • 08/17/2015

Cavity tuner for Booster particle accelerator

  • Image# FN0478
  • FN
  • 08/14/2015

The 300-ton NOvA neutrino detector at Fermilab

  • Image# FN0477
  • FN
  • 08/06/2015

CMS pixel detector work in the SiDet clean room - Construction of new pixel detector for CMS experiment

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