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  • Image# CE0348
  • CE
  • 11/05/2014

Fabiola Gianotti with incumbent Director-General Rolf Heuer (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN)

  • Image# CE0347
  • CE
  • 11/05/2014

Fabiola Gianotti, pictured here at the ATLAS detector, will be CERN's next Director-General. Her five-year mandate will begin on 1 January 2016 (Image: Claudia Marcelloni/CERN)

  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0446
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

A Fermilab scientist works on the laser beams at the heart of the Holometer experiment. The Holometer will use twin laser interferometers to test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab

  • Image# FN0447
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

Fermilab scientist Aaron Chou, left, project manager for the Holometer experiment, with the device that will test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# ST0021
  • ST
  • 08/21/2014

UK scientists have built a new facility aimed at understanding how particles from space can interact with electronic devices, and to investigate the chaos that cosmic rays can cause – such as taking communications satellites offline, wiping a device's memory or affecting aircraft electronics. ChipIR has successfully completed its first round of development testing before going in to full operation in 2015. Pictured here is Dr Chris Frost, ChipIR project scientist at ISIS. (Credit: STFC)

  • Image# BN0053
  • BN
  • 08/19/2014

Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee co-authored a paper describing the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a facility that is dedicated to studying nuclear physics. (Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# NI0028
  • NI
  • 08/13/2014

Professor Stan Bentvelsen has been appointed as the new director of Nikhef. (Credit: Jan Willem Steenmeijer)

  • Image# CE0346
  • CE
  • 05/15/2014

Italian particle physicist Fabiola Gianotti, a former spokesperson of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. (Image: CERN)

  • Image# BN0049
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

Technician Mike Myers checks components of stochastic cooling "kickers," which generate electric fields to nudge ions in RHIC's gold beams back into tightly packed bunches. This system of squeezing and cooling beams has produced dramatic increases in collision rates—and the data coming out of RHIC. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# DE0108
  • DE
  • 11/21/2013

The IceCube Lab under the stars. The IceCube Laboratory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, in Antarctica, hosts the computers collecting raw data. Due to satellite bandwidth allocations, the first level of reconstruction and event filtering happens in near real time in this lab. Only events selected as interesting for physics studies are sent to UW–Madison, where they are prepared for used by any member of the IceCube Collaboration. (Courtesy: Felipe Pedreros, IceCube/NSF)

  • Image# OT0171
  • OT
  • 11/05/2013

InterAction Collaboration meeting at SLAC, Menlo Park, CA, USA November 2013.

  • Image# OT0167
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

LUX researchers, seen here in a clean room on the surface at the Sanford Lab, work on the interior of the detector, before it is inserted into its titanium cryostat. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# OT0170
  • OT
  • 10/30/2013

The LUX co-spokespersons—Dan McKinsey, left, of Yale University and Rick Gaitskell of Brown University, pose on the top deck of the LUX experiment, 4,850 feet underground in the Sanford Lab. (Courtesy: Matt Kapust, Sanford Underground Research Facility)

  • Image# SL0109
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

Many of the SLAC and Stanford researchers who helped create the accelerator on a chip are pictured in SLAC's NLCTA lab where the experiments took place. Left to right: Robert Byer, Ken Soong, Dieter Walz, Ken Leedle, Ziran Wu, Edgar Peralta, Jim Spencer and Joel England. (Courtesy: Matt Beardsley/SLAC)

  • Image# FN0419
  • FN
  • 06/20/2013

Nigel Lockyer named new Fermilab director (Courtesy: Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0418
  • FN
  • 06/12/2013

Crews work to attach the red stabilizing apparatus to the Muon g-2 rings at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York in preparation for moving them over land and sea to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. (Courtesy: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# CE0337
  • CE
  • 03/16/2013

Presentation of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) latest results at Moriond/QCD conference, Mar. 9-16, 2013 at La Thuile, Italy (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# CE0338
  • CE
  • 03/16/2013

Presentation of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) latest results at Moriond/QCD conference, Mar. 9-16, 2013 at La Thuile, Italy (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# CE0339
  • CE
  • 03/16/2013

Presentation of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) latest results at Moriond/QCD conference, Mar. 9-16, 2013 at La Thuile, Italy (Courtesy: CERN)

  • Image# OT0157
  • OT
  • 11/20/2012

InterAction Collaboration meeting in Rome, November 2012.

  • Image# CE0314
  • CE
  • 07/06/2012

Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons. (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice)

  • Image# CE0315
  • CE
  • 07/06/2012

Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons. (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice)

  • Image# CE0303
  • CE
  • 07/04/2012

Rolf Heuer at CERN Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)

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