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  • Image# CE0348
  • CE
  • 11/05/2014

Fabiola Gianotti with incumbent Director-General Rolf Heuer (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN)

  • Image# CE0347
  • CE
  • 11/05/2014

Fabiola Gianotti, pictured here at the ATLAS detector, will be CERN's next Director-General. Her five-year mandate will begin on 1 January 2016 (Image: Claudia Marcelloni/CERN)

  • Image# SL0112
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Spencer Gessner, left, and Sebastien Corde monitor pairs of electron bunches sent into a plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET). (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0113
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. Here, SLAC researchers Michael Litos, left, and Sebastien Corde use a laser table at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) to create a plasma used for accelerating electrons to high energies in a very short distance. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0114
  • SL
  • 11/05/2014

In 2014, scientists from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and UCLA showed that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This is a milestone in demonstrating the practicality of plasma wakefield acceleration, a technique in which electrons gain energy by essentially surfing on a wave of electrons within an ionized gas. The simulation shown here depicts two electron bunches - containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each – that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. (Image courtesy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0446
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

A Fermilab scientist works on the laser beams at the heart of the Holometer experiment. The Holometer will use twin laser interferometers to test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab

  • Image# FN0447
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

Fermilab scientist Aaron Chou, left, project manager for the Holometer experiment, with the device that will test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0448
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

A close-up of the Holometer at Fermilab, an experiment designed to test the information storage capacity of the universe, and determine whether we live in a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0449
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

Top view of the Holometer as a Fermilab scientist works on the apparatus. The Holometer uses twin laser interferometers to look for "holographic noise" in space-time, and will test whether the universe is a 2-D hologram. Credit: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0450
  • FN
  • 08/26/2014

The holometer as constructed at Fermilab includes two interferometers in evacuated 6-inch steel tubes about 40 meters long. Optical systems (not shown here) in each one “recycle” laser light to create a very steady, intense laser wave with about a kilowatt of laser power to maximize the precision of the measurement. The outputs of the two photodiodes are correlated to measure the holographic jitter of the spacetime the two machines share. The holometer will measure jitter as small as a few billionths of a billionth of a meter. Illustration: Fermilab.

  • Image# ST0020
  • ST
  • 08/21/2014

UK scientists have built a new facility aimed at understanding how particles from space can interact with electronic devices, and to investigate the chaos that cosmic rays can cause – such as taking communications satellites offline, wiping a device's memory or affecting aircraft electronics. ChipIR has successfully completed its first round of development testing before going in to full operation in 2015. Pictured here is the CHIPIR build on 10 April 2014 (Credit: STFC)

  • Image# ST0021
  • ST
  • 08/21/2014

UK scientists have built a new facility aimed at understanding how particles from space can interact with electronic devices, and to investigate the chaos that cosmic rays can cause – such as taking communications satellites offline, wiping a device's memory or affecting aircraft electronics. ChipIR has successfully completed its first round of development testing before going in to full operation in 2015. Pictured here is Dr Chris Frost, ChipIR project scientist at ISIS. (Credit: STFC)

  • Image# BN0053
  • BN
  • 08/19/2014

Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee co-authored a paper describing the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a facility that is dedicated to studying nuclear physics. (Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# FN0444
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

Spiral galaxy NGC 0895 is located in the constellation Cetus, about 110 million light-years from Earth. This image was taken with the Dark Energy Camera, the primary research tool of the Dark Energy Survey, which just began its second year of cataloging deep space. (Photo: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# FN0443
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

This image of the NGC 1398 galaxy was taken with the Dark Energy Camera. This galaxy lives in the Fornax cluster, roughly 65 million light-years from Earth. It is 135,000 light-years in diameter, just slightly larger than our own Milky Way galaxy, and contains more than 100 billion stars. (Credit: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# FN0442
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

Stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, which houses the Dark Energy Camera in Chile. (Credit: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0445
  • FN
  • 08/18/2014

The large spiral galaxy in the center of this image is roughly 385 million light-years from Earth. This image was captured with the Dark Energy Camera as part of the first year of the Dark Energy Survey. The camera can see 8 billion light-years into deep space. (Photo: Dark Energy Survey)

  • Image# NI0028
  • NI
  • 08/13/2014

Professor Stan Bentvelsen has been appointed as the new director of Nikhef. (Credit: Jan Willem Steenmeijer)

  • Image# FN0439
  • FN
  • 07/30/2014

The 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet at rest inside the Fermilab building that will house the experiment. The magnet was moved into the new building on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The magnet will allow scientists to precisely probe the properties of subatomic particles called muons. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0440
  • FN
  • 07/30/2014

Workers slowly slide the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet inside the new building on the Fermilab site that will house the experiment. The magnet was moved into the building on Wednesday, July 30, 2014, while a crowd of scientists and onlookers watched. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0441
  • FN
  • 07/30/2014

Exactly one year to the day after completing a 3,200-mile journey from Long Island, the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet was moved across the Fermilab site on Saturday, July 26 to the new building that will house the experiment. Photo: Fermilab.

  • Image# FN0432
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The MicroBooNE detector is transported on a truck. Fermilab's Wilson Hall is in the background. The 30-ton neutrino detector was transported three miles across the Fermilab site on Monday, June 23, 2014, and placed in its new home in the Liquid-Argon Test Facility. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0433
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is slowly lowered through the open roof of the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab, where it will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment. Crews first took the roof of the building off with the massive crane, then lowered the detector into place. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0434
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector is gently lowered into the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab on Monday, June 23, 2014. The detector will become the centerpiece of the MicroBooNE experiment, which will study ghostly particles called neutrinos. (Photo: Fermilab.)

  • Image# FN0435
  • FN
  • 06/24/2014

The massive MicroBooNE neutrino detector is gently lowered into the main cavern of the Liquid-Argon Test Facility at Fermilab on Monday, June 23, 2014. The banner on the side reads "MicroBooNE – Driving Nu Physics." The Greek letter nu stands for neutrinos, the subatomic particles that the experiment will study. Photo: Fermilab.

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