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  • Image# BN0052
  • BN
  • 04/10/2014

The STAR detector at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As big as a house, STAR searches for signatures of the form of matter that RHIC aims to create: the quark-gluon plasma. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# FN0427
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A view of the top of the nearly completed NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The detector is made up of 28 PVC blocks, each weighing 417,000 pounds, and spans 51 feet by 51 feet by 200 feet. When it is completed and filled with liquid scintillator, the far detector will weigh 14,000 tons. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# FN0428
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

A graphic representation of one of the first neutrino interactions captured at the NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The dotted red line represents the neutrino beam, generated at Fermilab in Illinois and sent through 500 miles of earth to the far detector. The image on the left is a simplified 3-D view of the detector, the top right view shows the interaction from the top of the detector, and the bottom right view shows the interaction from the side of the detector. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0429
  • FN
  • 02/11/2014

Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014, with the nearly completed detector in the background. Each block of the detector measures about 50 feet by 50 feet by 6 feet and is made up of 384 plastic PVC modules, assembled flat on a massive pivoting machine. (Courtesy: NOvA collaboration)

  • Image# BN0048
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

At the heart of the PHENIX detector (top), a silicon vertex tracker (green layers behind the "X" shaped black structure in bottom image) surrounds the point where collisions take place. Together with forward silicon vertex trackers at each end of the barrel (one being adjusted by technician Mike Lenz), these components identify and count the decay products of particles made of heavy quarks streaming out of RHIC collisions. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# BN0050
  • BN
  • 02/03/2014

The central portion of the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) being installed at RHIC's STAR detector (top), and the surrounding portion before installation (bottom). The HFT will track particles made of "charm" and "beauty" quarks, rare varieties (or "flavors") that are more massive than the lighter "up" and "down" quarks that make up ordinary matter. (Courtesy: BNL)

  • Image# LB0058
  • LB
  • 01/08/2014

An artist's conception of the measurement scale of the universe. Baryon acoustic oscillations are the tendency of galaxies and other matter to cluster in spheres, which originated as density waves traveling through the plasma of the early universe. The clustering is greatly exaggerated in this illustration. The radius of the spheres (white line) is the scale of a “standard ruler” allowing astronomers to determine, within one percent accuracy, the large-scale structure of the universe and how it has evolved. (Courtesy: Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

  • Image# SL0106
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

Nanofabricated chips of fused silica just 3 millimeters long were used to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional particle accelerator technology. (Courtesy: Brad Plummer/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0107
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

The key to the accelerator chips is tiny, precisely spaced ridges, which cause the iridescence seen in this close-up photo. (Courtesy: Brad Plummer/SLAC)

  • Image# SL0108
  • SL
  • 09/27/2013

The nanoscale patterns of SLAC and Stanford's accelerator on a chip gleam in rainbow colors prior to being assembled and cut into their final forms. (Courtesy: Matt Beardsley/SLAC)

  • Image# FN0425
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0426
  • FN
  • 09/03/2013

Composite picture of stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# FN0423
  • FN
  • 09/02/2013

The Dark Energy Camera, mounted on the Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. (Courtesy: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab)

  • Image# OT0163
  • OT
  • 07/31/2013

M 31 captured by Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) (Courtesy: HSC Project/NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0164
  • OT
  • 07/31/2013

The image shows the position of HSC (without Filter Exchange Unit or FEU) when mounted on the inner, top ring of the Subaru Telescope. (Courtesy: NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0165
  • OT
  • 07/31/2013

A close-up of the top part of HSC with the FEU installed on it. (Courtesy: ASIAA)

  • Image# OT0161
  • OT
  • 06/12/2013

Render of International Linear Collider - Next-generation particle accelerator (Courtesy: Rey.Hori/KEK)

  • Image# OT0162
  • OT
  • 06/12/2013

International Linear Collider conceptual diagram - Next-generation particle accelerator (Courtesy: ILC GDE)

  • Image# FN0418
  • FN
  • 06/12/2013

Crews work to attach the red stabilizing apparatus to the Muon g-2 rings at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York in preparation for moving them over land and sea to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. (Courtesy: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

  • Image# OT0158
  • OT
  • 12/07/2012

IKAROS Spacecraft (Courtesy: JAXA)

  • Image# LB0055
  • LB
  • 12/04/2012

The BigBOSS proposal adds a new widefield, prime-focus corrector to the Mayall 4-meter telescope. A focal array with 5,000 optical fibers, individually positioned by robotic actuators, delivers light to a set of 10 three-arm spectrometers. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Background photo Mark Duggan)

  • Image# OT0153
  • OT
  • 09/12/2012

Hyper Suprime-Cam. The instrument weighs 3 tons and is 3 m (9 ft.) high. (Courtesy: NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0154
  • OT
  • 09/12/2012

The layout of the 116 CCDs with a total of 870 million pixels. (Courtesy: NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0155
  • OT
  • 09/12/2012

The Wide Field Corrector (Courtesy: NAOJ)

  • Image# OT0156
  • OT
  • 09/12/2012

Astronomers in the observation room of the Subaru Telescope carry out performance tests of HSC. (Courtesy: NAOJ)

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