https://www.interactions.org/index.rss en Filipino and Indian students win CERN Beamline for Schools competition 2018 https://www.interactions.org/press-release/filipino-indian-students-win-cern-beamline-schools Filipino and Indian students win CERN Beamline for Schools competition 2018Press Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Wed, 06/20/2018 - 08:232418<div class="pr-body"><p>Geneva, 20 June 2018. High-school students from the <a href="http://www.ismanila.org/">International School of Manila</a>, Philippines, and <a href="http://www.rnpodarschool.com/">R.N. Podar School</a> in Mumbai, India, are the winners of the 2018 <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/">Beamline for Schools competition</a>. In September, they will carry out their proposed experiments at CERN together with professional researchers.</p><p>This CERN initiative is open to high-school students from all over the world who want to get a taste of the life of a scientist. This year, 195 teams took part, an increase on the 180 teams participating in 2017. Overall, the competition involved more than 1500 students from 42 countries. The teams submitted a written proposal to address a physics question using a particle beam at CERN and a video to explain how they would do so.</p><p>Taking into consideration creativity, motivation, feasibility and scientific method, CERN experts shortlisted thirty teams[1]. All these teams will receive a cosmic ray detector known as <a href="http://cosmicpi.org/">Cosmic Pi</a>. The judges had a hard time choosing the winners but finally selected “Beamcats” from the Philippines and “Cryptic Ontics” from India. Among the shortlisted teams the following were exceptionally good and came close to winning: Club de Física “Enrico Fermi” (Spain), Dubai College Raiders of the Lost Quark (United Arab Emirates), ITU Bee (Turkey), Lahore Grammar School Johar Town (Pakistan), PAPRAD - Plastic Absorption of Proton Radiation (Sweden), Relativity Clock (Iran), Stalking Particles (Bangladesh) and The Strong Force (South Africa).</p><p>The Filipino team consists of 3 boys and 3 girls, who proposed to use particles known as pions for cancer therapy. They will simulate human tissues using materials that are similar in composition to the human body, and measure the energy lost by the beam while travelling through it, technically known as the Bragg peak. The use of subatomic particles instead of X-rays in anti-cancer radiation therapy is gaining increasing interest as it is potentially less harmful to the healthy tissues surrounding tumours. For example, CERN was actively involved in a collaborative design study that laid the foundations for two of Europe’s proton and carbon ion therapy centres: <a href="https://fondazionecnao.it/en/">CNAO</a> in Italy and <a href="https://www.medaustron.at/">MedAustron</a> in Austria.</p><article class="embedded-entity"><article><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/amp_metadata_content_image_min_696px_wide/public/image1.jpg?itok=jckSIzYU" width="696" height="614" alt="Team from the International School of Manila" typeof="foaf:Image" /></article></article><blockquote><p>“Hard work and perseverance is the foundation on which we measure our success, and the fact that our CERN mentors identified this quality within us and our proposal was truly amazing,” enthused Charvie Yadav from the Beamcats team. “This is such a valuable experience for me. I hope this inspires young students all around the world.”</p></blockquote><p>The “Cryptic Ontics” team consists of 9 boys and 9 girls. A core team of 9 students will visit CERN to study the deflection of protons and electrons in a magnetic field. By studying the interaction between charged particles and a magnetic field in the lab, the team hopes to learn about the anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field as a function of the variance of the cosmic ray detection rate.</p><article class="embedded-entity"><article><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/amp_metadata_content_image_min_696px_wide/public/image2.jpg?itok=RPB2HN6Z" width="696" height="464" alt=" Some of the winners from R.N. Podar School in Mumbai, India" typeof="foaf:Image" /></article></article><blockquote><p>“Winning this competition will not just help us practically in our studies and work, but will also teach us more about other people and working together. Altogether, I look forward to visiting CERN and to learning and growing along the way,” said Satchit Chatterji from the Cryptic Ontics team.</p></blockquote><p>This is the first time that Asian high schools have won the competition. Previously, students from the Netherlands, Greece, Italy (twice), South Africa, Poland, the United Kingdom and Canada were selected to perform their proposed experiments at CERN.</p><p>The first Beamline for Schools competition was held in 2014 on the occasion of CERN’s 60th anniversary.</p><blockquote><p>“This year it was even harder than before to select two winning teams. Many of the participating teams would have well deserved to be invited to CERN to carry out their experiments. We are grateful for the work and effort of all the teams who entered the competition and hope that even more teachers will encourage their students in the future to take part in this amazing experience,” said Sarah Aretz, Beamline for Schools project manager.</p></blockquote><p>Beamline for Schools is an <a href="http://giving.web.cern.ch/content/education-and-outreach">education and outreach project </a>funded by the CERN &amp; Society Foundation, supported by individual donors, foundations and companies. In 2018, the project is partially funded by the Arconic Foundation; additional contributions have been received from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, Amgen, as well as from the Ernest Solvay Fund, which is managed by the King Baudouin Foundation.</p><p>CERN’s accelerators will enter a two-year maintenance and upgrade shutdown at the end of this year, which means that there will be no beams serving the beamlines. CERN has therefore teamed up with the <a href="http://www.desy.de/index_eng.html">DESY</a> research centre in Hamburg, Germany's national laboratory for particle physics, accelerators and photon science, to continue the Beamline for Schools project during the upgrade, and the 2019 winners will perform their experiments there.</p><p> </p><p>Further information:</p><p><a href=" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0J-Gzge_Agw">Video from the team</a> “Beamcats”, <a href="http://www.ismanila.org/">International School of Manila</a> Philippines.</p><p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOVd3Y8GKRw&amp;feature=youtu.be">Video from the team</a> “Cryptic Ontics”, <a href="http://www.rnpodarschool.com/">R.N. Podar School in Mumbai</a> India</p><p> </p><p>1.<strong> Besides the two winners, CERN experts shortlisted 28 teams</strong>:</p><p><em>Acceletron Team from Jordan</em></p><p><em>Aμsing Twins from Bosnia and Herzegovina</em></p><p><em>CERNivores</em><em> from Spain</em></p><p><em>Club de Física "Enrico Fermi" from Spain</em></p><p><em>Cosmic Shield from Turkey</em></p><p><em>Dr.</em><em>Hesabi from Iran</em></p><p><em>Dubai College Raiders of the Lost Quark from </em><em>United</em><em> Arab Emirates</em></p><p><em>Graphene or Silicon from Iran</em></p><p><em>GyrosScope</em><em> from Cyprus</em></p><p><em>ITU Bee from Turkey</em></p><p><em>Knights of the Round Globe from Poland</em></p><p><em>Lahore Grammar School Johar Town from Pakistan</em></p><p><em>Muons and Marbles from Greece</em></p><p><em>NoIdea from Germany</em></p><p><em>PAPRAD</em><em> - Plastic Absorption of Proton Radiation from Sweden</em></p><p><em>Particle EsPIONage from Portugal</em></p><p><em>proMetHeus</em><em> crazY partIcLes from Greece</em></p><p><em>Relativity Clock from Iran</em></p><p><em>Scientia Exercitus from Turkey</em></p><p><em>Stalking Particles from Bangladesh</em></p><p><em>Superman Memory Crystal from Chile</em></p><p><em>Team LMB from India</em></p><p><em>The </em><em>Albertosauruses</em><em> from Canada</em></p><p><em>The beam team from Canada</em></p><p><em>The Earth Doctors from </em><em>United</em><em> States</em></p><p><em>The Strong Force from South Africa</em></p><p><em>Time </em><em>Flighters</em><em> from </em><em>United</em><em> States</em></p><p><em>V-</em><em>defyn</em><em> from India</em></p><p> </p><p>Further information</p><p><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch">Beamline for Schools </a></p><p><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/2018-edition">Beamline</a><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/2018-edition"> for Schools - 2018</a></p><p><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/updates/2018/05/more-1500-students-participated-bl4s-2018">More than 1500 students participated in BL4S 2018</a></p><p><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/bl4s-winners">Previous winners</a></p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> CERN </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=NL3pbbax" alt="Joe Incandela, CERN spokesperson for Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. They use the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments to study the basic constituents of matter – the fundamental particles. The particles are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives the physicists clues about how the particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature.</p><p><strong>Contact information</strong><br /> European Organization for Nuclear Research<br /> CERN<br /> CH-1211 Genève 23<br /> Switzerland<br /><br /> or<br /><br /> Organisation Européenne pour<br /> la Recherche Nucléaire<br /> F-01631 CERN Cedex<br /> France<br /> + 41 22 76 761 11<br /> + 41 22 76 765 55 (fax)<br /> &nbsp;</p></div><a href="https://home.cern/" target="_blank">https://home.cern/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p><a href="https://press.cern/" target="_blank">Press Office</a><br /> Arnaud Marsollier<br /><a href="mailto:Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch">Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch</a>&nbsp;<br /><a href="mailto:Press.office@cern.ch">Press.office@cern.ch</a><br /> + 41 22 76 74101</p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/CERNTV" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/cern/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/About/Global-en.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Funding</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Wed, 20 Jun 2018 13:23:04 +0000 xeno 14370 at https://www.interactions.org Major work starts to boost the luminosity of the LHC https://www.interactions.org/press-release/major-work-starts-boost-luminosity-lhc Major work starts to boost the luminosity of the LHCPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Thu, 06/14/2018 - 16:012318<div class="pr-body"><p>Geneva, 15 June 2018. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is officially entering a new stage. Today, a ground-breaking ceremony at CERN celebrates the start of the civil-engineering work for the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC): a new milestone in CERN’s history. By 2026 this major upgrade will have considerably improved the performance of the LHC, by increasing the number of collisions in the large experiments and thus boosting the probability of the discovery of new physics phenomena.</p><p>The LHC started colliding particles in 2010. Inside the 27-km LHC ring, bunches of protons travel at almost the speed of light and collide at four interaction points. These collisions generate new particles, which are measured by detectors surrounding the interaction points. By analysing these collisions, physicists from all over the world are deepening our understanding of the laws of nature.</p><p>While the LHC is able to produce up to 1 billion proton-proton collisions per second, the HL-LHC will increase this number, referred to by physicists as “luminosity”, by a factor of between five and seven, allowing about 10 times more data to be accumulated between 2026 and 2036. This means that physicists will be able to investigate rare phenomena and make more accurate measurements. For example, the LHC allowed physicists to unearth the Higgs boson in 2012, thereby making great progress in understanding how particles acquire their mass. The HL-LHC upgrade will allow the Higgs boson’s properties to be defined more accurately, and to measure with increased precision how it is produced, how it decays and how it interacts with other particles. In addition, scenarios beyond the Standard Model will be investigated, including supersymmetry (SUSY), theories about extra dimensions and quark substructure (compositeness).</p><blockquote><p>“The High-Luminosity LHC will extend the LHC’s reach beyond its initial mission, bringing new opportunities for discovery, measuring the properties of particles such as the Higgs boson with greater precision, and exploring the fundamental constituents of the universe ever more profoundly,” said CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti.</p></blockquote><p>The HL-LHC project started as an international endeavour involving 29 institutes from 13 countries. It began in November 2011 and two years later was identified as one of the main priorities of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, before the project was formally approved by the CERN Council in June 2016. After successful prototyping, many new hardware elements will be constructed and installed in the years to come. Overall, more than 1.2&nbsp;km of the current machine will need to be replaced with many new high-technology components such as magnets, collimators and radiofrequency cavities. &nbsp;</p><p>The secret to increasing the collision rate is to squeeze the particle beam at the interaction points so that the probability of proton-proton collisions increases. To achieve this, the HL-LHC requires about 130 new magnets, in particular 24 new superconducting focusing quadrupoles to focus the beam and four superconducting dipoles. Both the quadrupoles and dipoles reach a field of about 11.5 tesla, as compared to the 8.3 tesla dipoles currently in use in the LHC. Sixteen brand-new “crab cavities” will also be installed to maximise the overlap of the proton bunches at the collision points. Their function is to tilt the bunches so that they appear to move sideways – just like a crab.</p><p>Another key ingredient in increasing the overall luminosity in the LHC is to enhance the machine’s availability and efficiency. For this, the HL-LHC project includes the relocation of some equipment to make it more accessible for maintenance. The power converters of the magnets will thus be moved into separate galleries, connected by new innovative superconducting cables capable of carrying up to 100&nbsp;kA with almost zero energy dissipation.</p><blockquote><p>“Audacity underpins the history of CERN and the High-Luminosity LHC writes a new chapter, building a bridge to the future,” said CERN’s Director for Accelerators and Technology, Frédérick Bordry. “It will allow new research and with its new innovative technologies, it is also a window to the accelerators of the future and to new applications for society.”</p></blockquote><p>To allow all these improvements to be carried out, major civil-engineering work at two main sites is needed, in Switzerland and in France. This includes the construction of new buildings, shafts, caverns and underground galleries. Tunnels and underground halls will house new cryogenic equipment, the electrical power supply systems and various plants for electricity, cooling and ventilation.</p><p>During the civil engineering work, the LHC will continue to operate, with two long technical stop periods that will allow preparations and installations to be made for high luminosity alongside yearly regular maintenance activities. After completion of this major upgrade, the LHC is expected to produce data in high-luminosity mode from 2026 onwards. By pushing the frontiers of accelerator and detector technology, it will also pave the way for future higher-energy accelerators.</p><p>Further information:</p><p><a href="http://hilumilhc.web.cern.ch">HL-LHC website</a></p><p><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/search?cc=Press%20Office%20Photo%20Selection&amp;rg=100&amp;of=hpm&amp;p=internalnote%3A%22HL-LHC%22&amp;sf=year&amp;so=d">Selected HL-LHC photos</a></p><p><a href="https://press.cern/multimedia/videos-animations">Selected HL-LHC videos</a></p><p><a href="http://press.cern/press-releases/2015/10/lhc-luminosity-upgrade-project-moving-next-phase">LHC luminosity upgrade project moving to next phase (2015)</a></p><p><a href="http://home.cern/about/accelerators/high-luminosity-large-hadron-collider">The High-Luminosity LHC</a></p><p><a href="http://home.cern/new-technologies-high-luminosity-lhc">New technologies for the High-Luminosity LHC</a></p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> CERN </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=NL3pbbax" alt="Joe Incandela, CERN spokesperson for Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. They use the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments to study the basic constituents of matter – the fundamental particles. The particles are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives the physicists clues about how the particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature.</p><p><strong>Contact information</strong><br /> European Organization for Nuclear Research<br /> CERN<br /> CH-1211 Genève 23<br /> Switzerland<br /><br /> or<br /><br /> Organisation Européenne pour<br /> la Recherche Nucléaire<br /> F-01631 CERN Cedex<br /> France<br /> + 41 22 76 761 11<br /> + 41 22 76 765 55 (fax)<br /> &nbsp;</p></div><a href="https://home.cern/" target="_blank">https://home.cern/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p><a href="https://press.cern/" target="_blank">Press Office</a><br /> Arnaud Marsollier<br /><a href="mailto:Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch">Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch</a>&nbsp;<br /><a href="mailto:Press.office@cern.ch">Press.office@cern.ch</a><br /> + 41 22 76 74101</p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/CERNTV" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/cern/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/About/Global-en.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Funding</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Thu, 14 Jun 2018 21:01:20 +0000 xeno 14366 at https://www.interactions.org The Higgs boson reveals its affinity for the top quark https://www.interactions.org/press-release/higgs-boson-reveals-its-affinity-top-quark The Higgs boson reveals its affinity for the top quarkPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Mon, 06/04/2018 - 02:572218<div class="pr-body"><h3>New results from the <a href="http://atlas.cern/updates/physics-briefing/observation-tth-production">ATLAS</a> and <a href="http://cms.cern/news/tth-announcement">CMS</a> experiments at the LHC reveal how strongly the Higgs boson interacts with the heaviest known elementary particle, the top quark, corroborating our understanding of the Higgs and setting constraints on new physics.</h3><p>The Higgs boson interacts only with massive particles, yet it was discovered in its decay to two massless photons. Quantum mechanics allows the Higgs to fluctuate for a very short time into a top quark and a top anti-quark, which promptly annihilate each other into a photon pair. The probability of this process occurring varies with the strength of the interaction (known as coupling) between the Higgs boson and top quarks. Its measurement allows us to indirectly infer the value of the Higgs-top coupling. However, undiscovered heavy new-physics particles could likewise participate in this type of decay and alter the result.</p><p>This is why the Higgs boson is seen as a portal to new physics.</p><p>A more direct manifestation of the Higgs-top coupling is the emission of a Higgs boson by a top-antitop quark pair. Results presented today, at the LHCP conference in Bologna, describe the observation of this so-called "ttH production" process. Results from the CMS collaboration, with a significance exceeding five standard deviations (considered the gold standard) for the first time, have just been published in the journal Physical Review Letters; including more data from the ongoing LHC-run, the ATLAS collaboration just submitted new results for publication, with a larger significance. Together, these results are a great step forward in our knowledge of the properties of the Higgs boson. The findings of the two experiments are consistent with one another and with the Standard Model, and give us new clues for where to look for new physics.</p><blockquote><p>“These measurements by the CMS and ATLAS Collaborations give a strong indication that the Higgs boson has a key role in the large value of the top quark mass. While this is certainly a key feature of the Standard Model, this is the first time it has been verified experimentally with overwhelming significance,” said Karl Jakobs, Spokesperson of the ATLAS collaboration.</p></blockquote><blockquote><p>“The CMS analysis teams, and their counterparts in ATLAS, employed new approaches and advanced analysis techniques to reach this milestone. When ATLAS and CMS finish data taking in November of 2018, we will have enough events to challenge even more strongly the Standard Model prediction for ttH, to see if there is an indication of something new,” declared Joel Butler, Spokesperson of the CMS collaboration.</p></blockquote><p>Measuring this process is challenging, as it is rare: only 1% of Higgs bosons are produced in association with two top quarks and, in addition, the Higgs and the top quarks decay into other particles in many complex ways, or modes. Using data from proton–proton collisions collected at energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV, the ATLAS and CMS teams performed several independent searches for ttH production, each targeting different Higgs-decay modes (to W bosons, Z bosons, photons, τ leptons, and bottom-quark jets). To maximise the sensitivity to the experimentally challenging ttH signal, each experiment then combined the results from all of its searches.</p><p>It is gratifying that this result has come so early in the life of the LHC programme. This is due to the superb performance of the LHC machine, and of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, the use of advanced analysis techniques and the inclusion of all possible final states in the analysis. However, the precision of the measurements still leaves room for contributions from new physics. In the coming years, the two experiments will take much more data and improve the precision to see if the Higgs reveals the presence of physics beyond the Standard Model.</p><blockquote><p>“The superb performance of the LHC and the improved experimental tools in mastering this complex analysis led to this beautiful result,” added CERN Director for Research and Computing Eckhard Elsen. “It also shows that we are on the right track with our plans for the High-Luminosity LHC and the physics results it promises.”</p></blockquote></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> CERN </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=NL3pbbax" alt="Joe Incandela, CERN spokesperson for Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. They use the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments to study the basic constituents of matter – the fundamental particles. The particles are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives the physicists clues about how the particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature.</p><p><strong>Contact information</strong><br /> European Organization for Nuclear Research<br /> CERN<br /> CH-1211 Genève 23<br /> Switzerland<br /><br /> or<br /><br /> Organisation Européenne pour<br /> la Recherche Nucléaire<br /> F-01631 CERN Cedex<br /> France<br /> + 41 22 76 761 11<br /> + 41 22 76 765 55 (fax)<br /> &nbsp;</p></div><a href="https://home.cern/" target="_blank">https://home.cern/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p><a href="https://press.cern/" target="_blank">Press Office</a><br /> Arnaud Marsollier<br /><a href="mailto:Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch">Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch</a>&nbsp;<br /><a href="mailto:Press.office@cern.ch">Press.office@cern.ch</a><br /> + 41 22 76 74101</p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/CERNTV" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/cern/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/About/Global-en.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Funding</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Mon, 04 Jun 2018 07:57:55 +0000 xeno 14355 at https://www.interactions.org NOvA experiment sees strong evidence for antineutrino oscillation https://www.interactions.org/press-release/nova-experiment-sees-strong-evidence-antineutrino NOvA experiment sees strong evidence for antineutrino oscillationPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Fri, 06/01/2018 - 15:352118<div class="pr-body"><p>For more than three years, scientists on the NOvA collaboration have been observing particles called neutrinos as they oscillate from one type to another over a distance of 500 miles. Now, in a new result unveiled today at the <a href="https://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/nu2018/">Neutrino 2018</a> conference in Heidelberg, Germany, the collaboration has announced its first results using antineutrinos, and has seen strong evidence of muon antineutrinos oscillating into electron antineutrinos over long distances, a phenomenon that has never been unambiguously observed.</p><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><p>NOvA, based at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, is the world’s longest-baseline neutrino experiment. Its purpose is to discover more about neutrinos, ghostly yet abundant particles that travel through matter mostly without leaving a trace. The experiment’s long-term goal is to look for similarities and differences in how neutrinos and antineutrinos change from one type – in this case, muon – into one of the other two types, electron or tau. Precisely measuring this change in both neutrinos and antineutrinos, and then comparing them, will help scientists unlock the secrets that these particles hold about how the universe operates. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">NOvA uses two large particle detectors – a smaller one at Fermilab in Illinois, and a much larger one 500 miles away in northern Minnesota – to study a beam of particles generated by Fermilab’s accelerator complex and sent through the earth, with no tunnel required.</p><p>The new result is drawn from NOvA’s first run with antineutrinos, the antimatter counterpart to neutrinos. NOvA began studying antineutrinos in February of 2017. Fermilab’s accelerators create a beam of muon neutrinos (or muon antineutrinos), and NOvA’s far detector is specifically designed to see those particles changing into electron neutrinos (or electron antineutrinos) on their journey.</p><p>If antineutrinos did not oscillate from muon type to electron type, scientists would have expected to record just five electron antineutrino candidates in the NOvA far detector during this first run. But when they analyzed the data, they found 18, providing strong evidence that antineutrinos undergo this oscillation.</p><blockquote><p>“Antineutrinos are more difficult to make than neutrinos, and they are less likely to interact in our detector,” said Fermilab’s Peter Shanahan, co-spokesperson of the NOvA collaboration. “This first data set is a fraction of our goal, but the number of oscillation events we see is far greater than we would expect if antineutrinos didn’t oscillate from muon type to electron. &nbsp;It demonstrates the impact that Fermilab’s high-power particle beam has on our ability to study neutrinos and antineutrinos.”</p></blockquote><p>Although antineutrinos are known to oscillate, the change into electron antineutrinos over long distances has not yet been definitively observed. The T2K experiment, located in Japan, announced that it had observed hints of this phenomenon in 2017. The NOvA and T2K collaborations are working toward a combined analysis of their data in the coming years.</p><blockquote><p>“With this first result using antineutrinos, NOvA has moved into the next phase of its scientific program,” said Jim Siegrist, Associate Director for High Energy Physics at the Department of Energy Office of Science. “I’m pleased to see this important experiment continuing to tell us more about these fascinating particles.”</p></blockquote><p>NOvA’s new antineutrino result accompanies an improvement to its methods of analysis, leading to a more precise measurement of its neutrino data. From 2014 to 2017, NOvA saw 58 candidates for interactions from muon neutrinos changing into electron neutrinos, and scientists are using this data to move closer to unraveling some of the knottiest mysteries of these elusive particles.</p><p dir="ltr">The key to NOvA’s science program is comparing the rate at which electron neutrinos appear in the far detector with the rate that electron antineutrinos appear. A precise measurement of those differences will allow NOvA to achieve one of its main science goals: to determine which of the three types of neutrinos is the heaviest, and which the lightest.</p><p>Neutrinos have been shown to have mass, but scientists have not been able to directly measure that mass. However, with enough data, they can determine the relative masses of the three, a puzzle called the mass ordering. NOvA is working toward a definitive answer to this question. Scientists on the experiment will continue studying antineutrinos through 2019, and over the following years will eventually collect equal amounts of data from neutrinos and antineutrinos.</p><blockquote><p>“This first data set from antineutrinos is a just a start to what promises to be an exciting run,” said NOvA co-spokesperson Tricia Vahle of William &amp; Mary. “It’s early days, but NOvA is already giving us new insights into the many mysteries of neutrinos and antineutrinos.”</p></blockquote><p>For more information on neutrinos and neutrino research, please visit <a href="http://neutrinos.fnal.gov">http://neutrinos.fnal.gov</a>.</p><p>The NOvA collaboration includes more than 240 scientists from nearly 50 institutions in seven countries: Brazil, Colombia, Czech Republic, India, Russia, the U.K. and the U.S. For more information visit the experiment’s website at <a href="http://novaexperiment.fnal.gov">http://novaexperiment.fnal.gov</a>.</p><p>Fermilab is America’s premier national laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research. A U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, Fermilab is located near Chicago, Illinois, and operated under contract by the Fermi Research Alliance LLC, a joint partnership between the University of Chicago and the Universities Research Association Inc. Visit Fermilab’s website at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fnal.gov/">www.fnal.gov</a>&nbsp;and follow us on Twitter at&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/fermilab/">@Fermilab</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit&nbsp;<a href="http://science.energy.gov">science.energy.gov</a>.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Science contacts:</strong></p><ul><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">Peter Shanahan, Fermilab, NOvA co-spokesperson, <a href="mailto:shanahan@fnal.gov">shanahan@fnal.gov</a>, 630-840-8378</p></li><li dir="ltr"><p dir="ltr">Tricia Vahle, William &amp; Mary, NOvA co-spokesperson, <a href="mailto:plvahle@wm.edu">plvahle@wm.edu</a>, 757-221-3559</p></li></ul></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=_vfp927- 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=_vfp927- 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=zEtRECgE 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=zEtRECgE 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=zEtRECgE 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=P_KjLDs6" alt="Fermilab from the air" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture><div class="caption"><p>The Fermilab particle accelerator complex provides beam to numerous experiments and test stations. The accelerators can make beams of protons, neutrinos, muons, and other particles. The two-mile Main Injector makes the world's most intense high-energy neutrino beam. (Photographer: Reidar Hahn)</p></div></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>Fermilab is America's particle physics and accelerator laboratory. Founded in 1967, Fermilab drives discovery by investigating the smallest building blocks of matter using world-leading particle accelerator and detector facilities. We also use the universe as a laboratory, making measurements of the cosmos to the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy. Fermilab is located near Chicago, Illinois, and is managed by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science.</p><p>What are we made of? How did the universe begin? What secrets do the smallest, most elemental particles of matter hold, and how can they help us understand the intricacies of space and time?</p><p>Since 1967, Fermilab has worked to answer these and other fundamental questions and enhance our understanding of everything we see around us. As the United States' premier particle physics laboratory, we do science that matters. We work together with our international partners on the world's most advanced particle accelerators and dig down to the smallest building blocks of matter. We also probe the farthest reaches of the universe, seeking out the nature of dark matter and dark energy.</p><p>Fermilab's 6,800-acre site is located in Batavia, Illinois, and is managed by the&nbsp;<a class="gmail_msg" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.fra-hq.org/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1489700810529000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEedjZBMT_59JzLCxomHYgD3fsWgg" href="http://www.fra-hq.org/" target="_blank">Fermi Research Alliance LLC</a><span class="gmail_msg">&nbsp;for the&nbsp;</span><a class="gmail_msg" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://energy.gov/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1489700810529000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGy33Kd0F8ltHkJ3R0MLtwuJb3Bog" href="http://energy.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Department of Energy</a><span class="gmail_msg">&nbsp;</span><a class="gmail_msg" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://science.energy.gov/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1489700810529000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHVJg1e3ZgHKhUPRtw_B8zDvZQPEA" href="http://science.energy.gov/" target="_blank">Office of Science</a><span class="gmail_msg">. FRA is a partnership of the University of Chicago and Universities Research Association Inc., a consortium of 89 research universities.</span></p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="organization">Fermilab</span><br><span class="address-line1">P.O. Box 500</span><br><span class="locality">Batavia</span>, <span class="administrative-area">IL</span><span class="postal-code">60510-0500</span><br><span class="country">United States</span></p></div><p class="phone"> + 1 630 840 3000 </p> , <p class="phone"> + 1 630 840 4343 (fax) </p><a href="http://www.fnal.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.fnal.gov/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p>Andre Salles<br /><a href="http://www.fnal.gov/pub/about/communication/index.html" target="_blank">Fermilab Office of Communication</a><br /> + 1 630&nbsp;840 3351<br /> + 1 630 840 8780 (fax)<br /><a href="mailto:media@fnal.gov">media@fnal.gov</a></p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://news.fnal.gov/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Fermilab Newsroom</a></li><li><a href="http://symmetrymagazine.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Symmetry Magazine</a></li><li><a href="http://www.facebook.com/Fermilab/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Facebook</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/Fermilab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://www.instagram.com/fermilab/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Instagram</a></li><li><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/134273042@N07/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Flickr</a></li><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/fermilab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://www.linkedin.com/companies/fermilab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Fri, 01 Jun 2018 20:35:51 +0000 xeno 14353 at https://www.interactions.org TRIUMF welcomes Anne Louise Aboud in new Chief Operating Officer/Deputy Director, Operations role https://www.interactions.org/press-release/triumf-welcomes-anne-louise-aboud-new-chief-operating TRIUMF welcomes Anne Louise Aboud in new Chief Operating Officer/Deputy Director, Operations rolePress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Thu, 05/31/2018 - 22:352018<div class="pr-body"><p>As TRIUMF looks to the next 50 years, a new operations leader will help further enable and enhance the laboratory’s world-class research programs and services</p><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><p dir="ltr">June 1st, 2018, Vancouver, Canada – TRIUMF is pleased to announce that Ms. Anne Louise Aboud will join Canada’s particle accelerator centre in the new role of Chief Operating Officer (COO)/Deputy Director, Operations (DDO), effective June 1st, 2018.</p><p dir="ltr">The new COO/DDO role will play an integral role in helping TRIUMF realize its full potential and developing new ways to <meta charset="utf-8" />further enable and enhance the laboratory’s world-class research programs and services. <a href="https://www.triumf50.com/">Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year</a>, the TRIUMF community and network is larger than ever and has developed an unprecedented diversity of abilities and expertise. TRIUMF continually seeks new ways to propel progress and enhance operational excellence, particularly as it readies the <a href="http://www.triumf.ca/ariel">Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory</a> (ARIEL), a flagship multidisciplinary research facility for Canada.</p><p dir="ltr">As TRIUMF’s inaugural COO/DDO, Aboud will draw upon on her extensive operations experience to continue driving modernization efforts and addressing current challenges to further enable the strategic growth of TRIUMF’s internationally renowned science programs, as well as facilitate new collaborations and discoveries within its global network of partners and peer laboratories. Aboud has been a senior operations executive in the industrial, financial services, and health care sectors having worked at General Electric, TD Bank and LifeLabs. She holds a Bachelor of Engineering and Master of Business Administration from McGill University as well as a Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Toronto.</p><blockquote><p dir="ltr">“TRIUMF is well-recognized, internationally, for its calibre of scientific staff and discoveries,” said Aboud. “My primary role as the operations leader will be to ensure that we continue building a world-class support organization that will allow our science output to flourish, both in quality and quantity. TRIUMF has an incredible 50-year history of pushing the frontiers of research, and I am excited to be joining the lab at such a pivotal time to help continue driving excellence and innovation.”</p></blockquote><blockquote><p dir="ltr">“I am delighted to welcome Anne Louise Aboud to our TRIUMF community,” said TRIUMF Director Dr. Jonathan Bagger. “She brings with her a wealth of experience from diverse sectors and a demonstrated proficiency in operational excellence. TRIUMF will benefit greatly from her perspective and her contributions as we look to the next 50 years.”</p></blockquote><p dir="ltr">With Aboud joining the TRIUMF team, current TRIUMF Deputy Director Dr. Reiner Kruecken will continue to serve the laboratory’s community as he transitions to the role of Deputy Director, Research, also effective June 1, 2018. Working alongside Aboud and the TRIUMF team, Kruecken’s new role will see him focus his leadership on TRIUMF’s multidisciplinary research programs. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">You can get to know more about Aboud in this <a href="http://www.triumf.ca/current-events/introducing-anne-louise-aboud-triumf%E2%80%99s-new-chief-operating-officer-coodeputy-director">Q&amp;A with the TRIUMF team</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>About TRIUMF</strong></p><p dir="ltr">TRIUMF is Canada’s particle accelerator centre. The lab is a hub for discovery and innovation inspired by a half-century of ingenuity in answering nature's most challenging questions. From the hunt for the smallest particles in our universe to research that advances the next generation of batteries or develops isotopes to diagnose and treat disease, TRIUMF drives more than scientific discovery. Powered by its complement of top talent and advanced accelerator infrastructure, TRIUMF is pushing the frontiers in isotope science and innovation, as well as technologies to address fundamental and applied problems in particle and nuclear physics, and the materials and life sciences. In collaboration with 20 Canadian universities, TRIUMF's diverse community of nearly 600 multidisciplinary researchers, engineers, technicians, tradespeople, staff, and students create a unique incubator for Canadian excellence, as well as a portal to premier global collaborations. Our passion for understanding everything from the nature of the nucleus to the creation of the cosmos sparks imagination, inspiration, improved health, economic opportunity, and a better world for all.</p><p dir="ltr">For more information, visit <a href="http://www.triumf.ca">www.triumf.ca</a> and <a href="about:blank">www.triumf50.com</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">@TRIUMFLab<br /> &nbsp;</p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> TRIUMF </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=UFTjrCtr 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=FPVDvAEq 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=FPVDvAEq 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=FPVDvAEq 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=IO-Aoyia 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=IO-Aoyia 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=FPVDvAEq 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=XfGkPIPx 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=XfGkPIPx 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=XfGkPIPx 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/TR0005H.jpg?itok=C1gAjPlb" alt="The interior vacuum &quot;tank&quot; of TRIUMF&#039;s main cyclotron, the largest in the world. (Courtesy of TRIUMF)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture><div class="caption"><p>The interior vacuum "tank" of TRIUMF's main cyclotron, the largest in the world. (Courtesy of TRIUMF)</p></div></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>TRIUMF is one of the world’s leading subatomic physics laboratories. It brings together dedicated physicists and interdisciplinary talent, sophisticated technical resources, and commercial partners in a way that has established the laboratory as a global model of success. Its large user community is composed of international teams of scientists, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate and undergraduate students.</p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="address-line1">4004 Wesbrook Mall</span><br><span class="locality">Vancouver</span><span class="administrative-area">BC</span><span class="postal-code">V6T 2A3</span><br><span class="country">Canada</span></p></div><p class="phone"> 604.222.1047 </p><a href="http://www.triumf.ca/" target="_blank">http://www.triumf.ca/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p>Lisa Lambert</p><p>Head, Strategic Communications</p><p><a href="mailto:lisa@triumf.ca">lisa@triumf.ca</a></p><p>1.604.222.7356</p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/triumflab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/triumflab</a></li><li><a href="http://www.facebook.com/TRIUMFLab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.facebook.com/TRIUMFLab</a></li><li><a href="https://twitter.com/triumflab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://twitter.com/triumflab</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Fri, 01 Jun 2018 03:35:06 +0000 xeno 14351 at https://www.interactions.org Scientists publish statement supporting the International Linear Collider https://www.interactions.org/press-release/scientists-publish-statement-supporting-international-linear Scientists publish statement supporting the International Linear ColliderPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Wed, 05/30/2018 - 16:131918<div class="pr-body"><blockquote><p>“A giant&nbsp;leap in scientific knowledge”</p></blockquote><p>May 31st, 2018, Fukuoka, Japan - Scientists gathering in Fukuoka, Japan, for a scientific conference about a possible future particle physics project in Japan to complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its upgrade at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, are calling for a prompt realisation of the International Linear Collider (ILC) . Having expressed&nbsp;their strong support for the scientific justification of the International Linear Collider through a statement issued during a scientific workshop in Tokyo in 2015, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC) and participants to the 2018 Asian Linear Collider Workshop (ALCW2018) in Fukuoka, Japan, reconfirm the scientific importance of the ILC in an updated statement that takes into account changes that have been made to the project’s specifications.</p><p>Statement:</p><p>Statement on “Towards the realization of the International Linear Collider, an update”</p><p class="text-align-center">31 May 2018, Fukuoka</p><p>Scientists who gathered for the Linear Collider Workshop in Tokyo in 2015 issued a statement confirming their strong support for the scientific justification for a prompt realization of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC) and the worldwide participants at the 2018 Asian Linear Collider Workshop (ALCW2018) in Fukuoka, Japan, reconfirm the scientific importance of the ILC. We are closer to the realization of the project, but it is now in a critical phase.</p><ol><li>Results to date from the CERN Large Hadron Collider indicate that we are at a crossroads in our quest to uncover the origin and history of the Universe. We now know that precision measurements, in particular of the properties of the Higgs boson, are an essential next step to advance our understanding. Precise measurements in electron-positron interactions at a center of mass energy of 250 GeV at the ILC will deliver a leap in our scientific knowledge and, together with future results from the LHC and SuperKEKB, will propel us toward the ultimate theory of particle physics and a deep understanding of the Universe itself.</li></ol><p>&nbsp;</p><ol start="2"><li>We have been preparing for the ILC for many years, in collaboration with industries and in discussion with governments worldwide. The ILC is now the most mature and realizable electron-positron collider project, and offers the energy expandability of a linear collider. The successful operation of the European XFEL in Hamburg and recent advances in the superconducting R&amp;D in Fermilab near Chicago and other laboratories, together with a cost reduction by changing the initial center of mass energy to 250 GeV, increases the ILC technical and financial feasibility whilst maintaining the physics potential of the machine at this energy. The superconducting technology being developed for the ILC has a great impact on industrial and medical applications of accelerators. We deeply appreciate the evaluation process by the Japanese government for the proposal based on the new ILC design.</li></ol><p>&nbsp;</p><ol start="3"><li>The ILC can only be realized as an international project, and a nation who wishes to host the project should lead the international negotiations. A positive message from the Japanese government expressing readiness to initiate these discussions this year is critically important because work on the update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, including collaboration in the ILC construction, will start early next year. This update will have a large impact outside Europe on the future of high energy physics projects worldwide. While we will strongly present the scientific case for the ILC in these discussions, it is essential to hear a positive message from the Japanese government in a timely manner.</li></ol><p>&nbsp;</p><p class="text-align-right">Lyn Evans</p><p class="text-align-right">LCC Director</p><p class="text-align-right">For scientists from LCC and ALCW2018</p><p>Background information:&nbsp;</p><p>The International Linear Collider is a proposed particle accelerator whose mission is to carry out research about the fundamental particles and forces that govern the Universe. It would complement the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, where the Higgs boson was discovered in 2012, and shed more light on the discoveries scientists have made and are likely to make there in the coming years. The ILC will be one of the world’s largest and most sophisticated scientific endeavours. The realisation of the ILC will require truly global participation.</p><p>The Linear Collider Collaboration consists of scientists and engineers working on the Compact Linear Collider Study (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is headed by former LHC Project Director Lyn Evans and coordinates the world-wide research and development for accelerators and detectors.</p><p>For more information, go to</p><p><a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/1711.00568.pdf">The International Linear Collider Machine Staging Report 2017</a></p><p><a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/1710.07621.pdf">Physics Case for the 250 GeV Stage of the International Linear Collider</a></p><p>....</p><p>More information on the International Linear Collider:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.linearcollider.org">www.linearcollider.org</a></p><p>&nbsp;</p></div> Wed, 30 May 2018 21:13:15 +0000 xeno 14349 at https://www.interactions.org Supercomputers Provide New Window Into the Life and Death of a Neutron https://www.interactions.org/press-release/supercomputers-provide-new-window-life-death-neutron Supercomputers Provide New Window Into the Life and Death of a NeutronPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Wed, 05/30/2018 - 09:141818<div class="pr-body"><h3>Berkeley Lab-led research team simulates sliver of the universe to tackle subatomic-scale physics problem&nbsp;</h3><p>Experiments that measure the lifetime of neutrons reveal a perplexing and unresolved discrepancy. While this lifetime has been measured to a precision within 1 percent using different techniques, apparent conflicts in the measurements offer the exciting possibility of learning about as-yet undiscovered physics.</p><p>Now, a team led by scientists in the Nuclear Science Division at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate a quantity known as the “nucleon axial coupling,” or gA&nbsp;– which is central to our understanding of a neutron’s lifetime – with an unprecedented precision. Their method offers a clear path to further improvements that may help to resolve the experimental discrepancy.</p><p>To achieve their results, the researchers created a microscopic slice of a simulated universe to provide a window into the subatomic world. Their study was&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0161-8&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678269000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGjKcxWELy2NcUOlGHXnFQghWqmUA" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0161-8" target="_blank">published</a>&nbsp;online May 30 in the journal&nbsp;Nature.</p><p>The nucleon axial coupling is more exactly defined as the strength at which one component (known as the axial component) of the “weak current” of the Standard Model of particle physics couples to the neutron. The weak current is given by one of the four known fundamental forces of the universe and is responsible for radioactive<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.particleadventure.org/npe.html&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678269000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHR3Z8G13-QvNHgPkHVIMapiV_kFw" href="http://www.particleadventure.org/npe.html" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.particleadventure.org/npe.html&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678269000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHR3Z8G13-QvNHgPkHVIMapiV_kFw" href="http://www.particleadventure.org/npe.html" target="_blank">beta decay</a>&nbsp;– the process by which a neutron decays to a proton, an electron, and a neutrino.</p><p>In addition to measurements of the neutron lifetime, precise measurements of neutron beta decay are also used to probe new physics beyond the Standard Model. Nuclear physicists seek to resolve the lifetime discrepancy and augment with experimental results by determining gA&nbsp;more precisely.</p><p>The researchers turned to quantum chromodynamics (QCD), a cornerstone of the Standard Model that describes how quarks and gluons interact with each other. Quarks and gluons are the fundamental building blocks for larger particles, such as neutrons and protons. The dynamics of these interactions determine the mass of the neutron and proton, and also the value of gA.</p><p>But sorting through QCD’s inherent complexity to produce these quantities requires the aid of massive supercomputers. In the latest study, researchers applied a numeric simulation known as lattice QCD, which represents QCD on a finite grid.</p><p>While a type of mirror-flip symmetry in particle interactions called parity (like swapping your right and left hands) is respected by the interactions of QCD, and the axial component of the weak current flips parity – parity is not respected by nature (analogously, most of us are right-handed). And because nature breaks this symmetry, the value of gA&nbsp;can only be determined through experimental measurements or theoretical predictions with lattice QCD.</p><p>The team’s new theoretical determination of gA&nbsp;is based on a simulation of a tiny piece of the universe – the size of a few neutrons in each direction. They simulated a neutron transitioning to a proton inside this tiny section of the universe, in order to predict what happens in nature.</p><p>The model universe contains one neutron amid a sea of quark-antiquark pairs that are bustling under the surface of the apparent emptiness of free space.</p><p>“Calculating gA&nbsp;was supposed to be one of the simple benchmark calculations that could be used to demonstrate that lattice QCD can be utilized&nbsp;for basic nuclear physics research, and for precision tests that look for new physics in nuclear physics backgrounds,” said André Walker-Loud, a staff scientist in Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Science Division who led the new study. “It turned out to be an exceptionally difficult quantity to determine.”</p><p>This is because lattice QCD calculations are complicated by exceptionally noisy statistical results that had thwarted major progress in reducing uncertainties in previous gA&nbsp;calculations.&nbsp;&nbsp;Some researchers had previously estimated that it would require the next generation of the nation’s most advanced supercomputers to achieve a 2 percent precision for gA&nbsp;by around 2020.</p><p>The team participating in the latest study developed a way to improve their calculations of gA&nbsp;using an unconventional approach and supercomputers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge Lab) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore Lab). The study involved scientists from more than a dozen institutions, including researchers from UC Berkeley and several other Department of Energy national labs.</p><p>Chia Cheng “Jason” Chang, the lead author of the publication and a postdoctoral researcher in Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Science Division, said, “Past calculations were all performed amidst this more noisy environment,” which clouded the results they were seeking. Chang is also a research scientist with the Interdisciplinary Theoretical and Mathematical Sciences Program at RIKEN in Japan.</p><p>Walker-Loud added, “We found a way to extract gA&nbsp;earlier in time, before the noise ‘explodes’ in your face.”</p><p>Chang said, “We now have a purely theoretical prediction of the lifetime of the neutron, and it is the first time we can predict the lifetime of the neutron to be consistent with experiments.”</p><p>“This was an intense 2 1/2-year project that only came together because of the great team of people working on it,” Walker-Loud said.</p><p>This latest calculation also places tighter constraints on a branch of physics theories that stretch beyond the Standard Model – constraints that exceed those set by powerful particle collider experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. But the calculations aren’t yet precise enough to determine if new physics have been hiding in the gA&nbsp;and neutron lifetime measurements.</p><p>Chang and Walker-Loud noted that the main limitation to improving upon the precision of their calculations is in supplying more computing power.</p><p>“We don’t have to change the technique we’re using to get the precision necessary,” Walker-Loud said.</p><p>The latest work builds upon decades of research and computational resources by the lattice QCD community. In particular, the research team relied upon QCD data generated by the<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~sg/milc/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNE4F_PuyHsNypsy-PDVA8_EKEzWlw" href="http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~sg/milc/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~sg/milc/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNE4F_PuyHsNypsy-PDVA8_EKEzWlw" href="http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~sg/milc/" target="_blank">MILC Collaboration</a>; an open source software library for lattice QCD called<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://jeffersonlab.github.io/chroma/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpnQiR4oGhzmQJRJTpa-wn21asIg" href="https://jeffersonlab.github.io/chroma/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://jeffersonlab.github.io/chroma/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpnQiR4oGhzmQJRJTpa-wn21asIg" href="https://jeffersonlab.github.io/chroma/" target="_blank">Chroma</a>, developed by the&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.usqcd.org&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEZgk9OggE3e3vJLcbboL3_sdaRWg" href="https://www.usqcd.org/" target="_blank">USQCD collaboration</a>; and<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://lattice.github.io/quda/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGTEzCL7EP1tK4lPe8RndgJx1aHvw" href="https://lattice.github.io/quda/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://lattice.github.io/quda/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGTEzCL7EP1tK4lPe8RndgJx1aHvw" href="https://lattice.github.io/quda/" target="_blank">QUDA</a>, a highly optimized open source software library for lattice QCD calculations.</p><p>The team drew heavily upon the power of<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/olcf-resources/compute-systems/titan/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHmM0t2sanVRTEhar0juiR16eckew" href="https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/olcf-resources/compute-systems/titan/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/olcf-resources/compute-systems/titan/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHmM0t2sanVRTEhar0juiR16eckew" href="https://www.olcf.ornl.gov/olcf-resources/compute-systems/titan/" target="_blank">Titan</a>, a supercomputer at Oak Ridge Lab equipped with graphics processing units, or GPUs, in addition to more conventional central processing units, or CPUs. GPUs have evolved from their early use in accelerating video game graphics to current applications in evaluating large arrays for tackling complicated algorithms pertinent to many fields of science.</p><p>The axial coupling calculations used about 184 million “Titan hours” of computing power – it would take a single laptop computer with a large memory about 600,000 years to complete the same calculations.</p><p>As the researchers worked through their analysis of this massive set of numerical data, they realized that more refinements were needed to reduce the uncertainty in their calculations.</p><p>The team was assisted by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility staff to efficiently utilize their 64 million Titan-hour allocation, and they also turned to the Multiprogrammatic and Institutional Computing program at Livermore Lab, which gave them more computing time to resolve their calculations and reduce their uncertainty margin to just under 1 percent.</p><p>“Establishing a new way to calculate gA&nbsp;has been a huge rollercoaster,” Walker-Loud said.</p><p>With more statistics from more powerful supercomputers, the research team hopes to drive the uncertainty margin down to about 0.3 percent. “That’s where we can actually begin to discriminate between the results from the two different experimental methods of measuring the neutron lifetime,” Chang said. “That’s always the most exciting part: When the theory has something to say about the experiment.”</p><p>He added, “With improvements, we hope that we can calculate things that are difficult or even impossible to measure in experiments.”</p><p>Already, the team has applied for time on a next-generation supercomputer at Oak Ridge Lab called Summit, which would greatly speed up the calculations.</p><p>In addition to researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, the science team also included researchers from University of North Carolina, RIKEN BNL Research Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Jülich Research Center in Germany, the University of Liverpool in the U.K., the College of William &amp; Mary, Rutgers University, the University of Washington, the University of Glasgow in the U.K., NVIDIA Corp., and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.</p><p>One of the study participants is a scientist at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The Titan supercomputer is a part of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). NERSC and OLCF are DOE Office of Science User Facilities.</p><p>The work was supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development programs at Berkeley Lab, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, the Nuclear Physics Double Beta Decay Topical Collaboration, the DOE Early Career Award Program, the NVIDIA Corporation, the Joint Sino-German Research Projects of the German Research Foundation and National Natural Science Foundation of China, RIKEN in Japan, the Leverhulme Trust, the National Science Foundation’s Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, DOE’s Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Multiprogrammatic and Institutional Computing program through a Tier 1 Grand Challenge award.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world’s most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe. Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab’s scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel Prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. For more, visit<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.lbl.gov&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEoy_vUENUZ3T6A3IABWYSEdYCIpw" href="http://www.lbl.gov/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.lbl.gov&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEoy_vUENUZ3T6A3IABWYSEdYCIpw" href="http://www.lbl.gov/" target="_blank">www.lbl.gov</a>.</p><p>DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://science.energy.gov&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFR5ahc0_bnW5skCs1g_A69BYwP5w" href="http://science.energy.gov/" target="_blank">&nbsp;</a><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://science.energy.gov&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1527775678270000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFR5ahc0_bnW5skCs1g_A69BYwP5w" href="http://science.energy.gov/" target="_blank">science.energy.gov</a>.</p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=UAEmK6cw 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=69gXc47Y 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=69gXc47Y 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=69gXc47Y 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=xKIWM28z 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=xKIWM28z 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=69gXc47Y 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=TqpUKAXX 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=TqpUKAXX 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=TqpUKAXX 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/LB0043H.jpg?itok=rM4OMvEP" alt="Shielding blocks removed exposing the Bevatron. (Courtesy: Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture><div class="caption"><p>Shielding blocks removed exposing the Bevatron. (Courtesy: Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)</p></div></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>In the world of science, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is synonymous with “excellence.” Thirteen Nobel prizes are associated with Berkeley Lab. Seventy Lab scientists are members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), one of the highest honors for a scientist in the United States. Thirteen of our scientists have won the National Medal of Science, our nation’s highest award for lifetime achievement in fields of scientific research. Eighteen of our engineers have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, and three of our scientists have been elected into the Institute of Medicine. In addition, Berkeley Lab has trained thousands of university science and engineering students who are advancing technological innovations across the nation and around the world.</p><p>Berkeley Lab is a multidisciplinary national laboratory located in Berkeley, California on a hillside directly above the campus of the University of California at Berkeley. The site consists of 76 buildings located on 183 acres, which overlook both the campus and the San Francisco Bay.</p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="address-line1">1 Cyclotron Road</span><br><span class="locality">Berkeley</span>, <span class="administrative-area">CA</span><span class="postal-code">94720</span><br><span class="country">United States</span></p></div><p class="phone"> 510-486-4000 </p><a href="http://www.lbl.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.lbl.gov/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p>Glenn Roberts Jr.,<br /> Public Affairs, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory<br /><a href="mailto:geroberts@lbl.gov" target="_blank">geroberts@lbl.gov</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://newscenter.lbl.gov/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1470843500562000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGdHmcUWK1oUeX-OQdifXOq7qNgDQ" href="http://newscenter.lbl.gov/" target="_blank">http://newscenter.lbl.gov/</a></p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://twitter.com/BerkeleyLab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://twitter.com/BerkeleyLab</a></li><li><a href="http://instagram.com/berkeleylab#" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://instagram.com/berkeleylab#</a></li><li><a href="http://www.facebook.com/BerkeleyLab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.facebook.com/BerkeleyLab</a></li><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/BerkeleyLab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/user/BerkeleyLab</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Wed, 30 May 2018 14:14:34 +0000 xeno 14347 at https://www.interactions.org XENON1T probes deeper into Dark Matter WIMPs, with 1300 kg of cold Xe atoms https://www.interactions.org/press-release/xenon1t-probes-deeper-dark-matter-wimps-1300-kg-cold-xe XENON1T probes deeper into Dark Matter WIMPs, with 1300 kg of cold Xe atomsPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Mon, 05/28/2018 - 05:001718<div class="pr-body"><p>Results from <a href="http://www.xenon1t.org/">XENON1T</a>, the world’s largest and most sensitive detector dedicated to a direct search for Dark Matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), are reported today (Monday, 28th May) by the spokesperson, Prof. Elena Aprile of Columbia University, in a seminar at the hosting laboratory, the INFN <a href="www.lngs.infn.it">Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso</a> (LNGS), in Italy. The international collaboration of more than 165 researchers from 27 institutions, has successfully operated XENON1T, collecting an unprecedentedly large exposure of about 1 tonne x year with a 3D imaging liquid xenon time projection chamber. The data are consistent with the expectation from background, and place the most stringent limit on spin-independent interactions of WIMPs with ordinary matter for a WIMP mass higher than 6 GeV/c². The sensitivity achieved with XENON1T is almost four orders of magnitude better than that of XENON10, the first detector of the XENON Dark Matter project, which has been hosted at LNGS since 2005. Steadily increasing the fiducial target mass from the initial 5 kg to the current 1300 kg, while simultaneously decreasing the background rate by a factor 5000, the XENON collaboration has continued to be at the forefront of Dark Matter direct detection, probing deeper into the WIMP parameter space. </p><p>WIMPs are a class of Dark Matter candidates which are being frantically searched with experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, in space, and on Earth. Even though about a billion WIMPs are expected to cross a surface of one square meter per second on Earth, they are extremely difficult to detect. Results from XENON1T show that WIMPs, if they indeed comprise the Dark Matter in our galaxy, will result in a rare signal, so rare that even the largest detector built so far cannot see it directly. XENON1T is a cylindrical detector of approximately one meter height and diameter, filled with liquid xenon at -95 °C, with a density three times that of water. In XENON1T, the signature of a WIMP interaction with xenon atoms is a tiny flash of scintillation light and a handful of ionization electrons, which themselves are turned into flashes of light. Both light signals are simultaneously recorded with ultra-sensitive photodetectors, giving the energy and 3D spatial information on an event-by-event basis.</p><article class="embedded-entity"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop_non_retina/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=j4fDAvcK 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=r-BMURWs 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=r-BMURWs 2x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"></source><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=r-BMURWs 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=r-BMURWs 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"></source><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop_non_retina/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=j4fDAvcK 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop_non_retina/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=j4fDAvcK 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_large_desktop_non_retina/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=j4fDAvcK 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"></source><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/original_image_tablet_/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=1pO8XEo3 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_image_tablet_/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=1pO8XEo3 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"></source><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/original_image_small_phone/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=AfqYJJFM 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_image_small_phone/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=AfqYJJFM 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/original_image_phone/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=kBrEjGOw 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"></source><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/original_image_phone/public/XENON1T-min.jpeg?itok=kBrEjGOw" alt="XENON installation in the basement" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></article><blockquote><p><i><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">XENON1T installation in the underground hall of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The three story building houses various auxiliary systems. The cryostat containing the LXeTPC is located inside the large water tank next to the building. Photo by Roberto Corrieri and Patrick De Perio.</span></span></span></i></p></blockquote><p>In developing this unique type of detector to search for a rare WIMP signal, many challenges had to be overcome; first and foremost the reduction of the overwhelmingly large background from many sources, from radioactivity to cosmic rays. Today, XENON1T is the largest Dark Matter experiment with the lowest background ever measured, counting a mere 630 events in one year and one tonne of xenon in the energy region of interest for a WIMP search. The search results, submitted to Physical Review Letters, are based on 1300 kg out of the total 2000 kg active xenon target and 279 days of data, making it the first WIMP search with a noble liquid target exposure of 1.0 tonne x year. Only two background events were expected in the innermost, cleanest region of the detector, but none were detected, setting the most stringent limit on WIMPs with masses above 6 GeV/c² to date. XENON1T continues to acquire high-quality data and the search will continue until it will be upgraded with a larger mass detector, being developed by the collaboration. With another factor of four increase in fiducial target mass, and ten times less background rate, XENONnT will be ready in 2019 for a new exploration of particle Dark Matter at a level of sensitivity nobody imagined when the project started in 2002.</p><p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span lang="EN-GB" style="color:#333333" xml:lang="EN-GB"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YMGZAKv11Q">Short</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YMGZAKv11Q"> movie on the construction of XENON1T at LNGS</a></span></span></span></span></p><p class="p1" style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:9pt"><span style="font-family:Helvetica"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Additional Contact:</span></span></span></span></p><p class="p1" style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:9pt"><span style="font-family:Helvetica"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">The XENON spokesperson</span></span></span></span></p><p class="p1" style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:9pt"><span style="font-family:Helvetica"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Prof. Elena Aprile, Columbia University, New York, US.</span></span></span></span></p><p class="p1" style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:9pt"><span style="font-family:Helvetica"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Tel. +39 3494703313</span></span></span></span></p><p class="p1" style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:9pt"><span style="font-family:Helvetica"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Tel. +1 212 854 3258</span></span></span></span></p><p class="p1" style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:9pt"><span style="font-family:Helvetica"><span class="MsoHyperlink" style="color:blue"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:12.0pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><a href="mailto:age@astro.columbia.edu" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">age@astro.columbia.edu</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"> </p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=Iq7v8QPr 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=aS4dwDPw 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=aS4dwDPw 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=aS4dwDPw 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=8RGKkSKk 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=8RGKkSKk 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=aS4dwDPw 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=E3PpAOwK 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=E3PpAOwK 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=E3PpAOwK 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/IN0044H.jpg?itok=JtS6h-Em" alt="The DAPHNE building. (Credit: Courtesy of INFN)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture><div class="caption"><p>The DAPHNE building. (Credit: Courtesy of INFN)</p></div></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>The National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) is the Italian research agency dedicated to the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws that govern them, under the supervision of the Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR). It conducts theoretical and experimental research in the fields of subnuclear, nuclear and astroparticle physics. All of the INFN’s research activities are undertaken within a framework of international competition, in close collaboration with Italian universities on the basis of solid academic partnerships spanning decades. Fundamental research in these areas requires the use of cutting-edge technology and instruments, developed by the INFN at its own laboratories and in collaboration with industries. Groups from the Universities of Rome, Padua, Turin, and Milan founded the INFN on 8<sup>th</sup>August 1951 to uphold and develop the scientific tradition established during the 1930s by Enrico Fermi and his school, with their theoretical and experimental research in nuclear physics. In the latter half of the 1950s the INFN designed and built the first Italian accelerator, the electron synchrotron developed in Frascati, where its first national laboratory was set up. During the same period, the INFN began to participate in research into the construction and use of ever-more powerful accelerators being conducted by CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, in Geneva. Today the INFN employs some 5,000 scientists whose work is recognised internationally not only for their contribution to various European laboratories, but also to numerous research centres worldwide.</p><p>piazza dei Caprettari, 70<br /> Roma 00186</p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="organization">Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare</span><br><span class="address-line1">piazza dei Caprettari, 70</span><br><span class="postal-code">00186</span><span class="locality">Roma</span><span class="administrative-area">RM</span><br><span class="country">Italy</span></p></div><p class="phone"> (+39) 06 68 68 162, 06 98017987, 06 6840 </p><a href="http://home.infn.it/en/" target="_blank">http://home.infn.it/en/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p style="text-align: left;">Antonella Varaschin<br /> INFN Communications Office<br /> antonella.varaschin@presid.infn.it<br /> +39 06 6868162</p><p style="text-align: left;">fax +39 06 68307944<br /><span id="cloakc29053e1e14f1d222bb2211c80abcdb6">Comunicazione@presid.infn.it</span></p></div></div></div></div></div></div> Mon, 28 May 2018 10:00:00 +0000 xeno 14342 at https://www.interactions.org OPERA collaboration presents its final results on neutrino oscillations. https://www.interactions.org/press-release/opera-collaboration-presents-its-final-results-neutrino OPERA collaboration presents its final results on neutrino oscillations.Press Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Tue, 05/22/2018 - 07:201618<div class="pr-body"><p>Geneva, 22 May 2018. The OPERA experiment, located at the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), was designed to conclusively prove that muon-neutrinos can convert to tau-neutrinos, through a process called neutrino oscillation, whose discovery was awarded the 2015 Nobel Physics Prize. In a paper published today in the journal <a href="http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.211801">Physical Review Letters,</a> the OPERA collaboration reports the observation of a total of 10 candidate events for a muon to tau-neutrino conversion, in what are the very final results of the experiment. This demonstrates unambiguously that muon neutrinos oscillate into tau neutrinos on their way from CERN, where muon neutrinos were produced, to the Gran Sasso Laboratory 730km away, where OPERA detected the ten tau neutrino candidates.</p><p>Today the OPERA collaboration has also made their data public through the <a href="http://opendata.cern.ch/docs/opera-news-first-release-2018">CERN Open Data Portal</a>. By releasing the data into the public domain, researchers outside the OPERA Collaboration have the opportunity to conduct novel research with them. The datasets provided come with rich context information to help interpret the data, also for educational use. A visualizer enables users to see the different events and download them. This is the first non-LHC data release through the CERN Open Data portal, a service launched in 2014.</p><p>There are three kinds of neutrinos in nature: electron, muon and tau neutrinos. They can be distinguished by the property that, when interacting with matter, they typically convert into the electrically charged lepton carrying their name: electron, muon and tau leptons. It is these leptons that are seen by detectors, such as the OPERA detector, unique in its capability of observing all three. Experiments carried out around the turn of the millennium showed that muon neutrinos, after traveling long distances, create fewer muons than expected, when interacting with a detector. This suggested that muon neutrinos were oscillating into other types of neutrinos. Since there was no change in the number of detected electrons, physicists suggested that muon neutrinos were primarily oscillating into tau neutrinos. This has now been unambiguously confirmed by OPERA, through the direct observation of tau neutrinos appearing hundreds of kilometers away from the muon neutrino source. The clarification of the oscillation patterns of neutrinos sheds light on some of the properties of these mysterious particles, such as their mass.</p><p>The OPERA collaboration observed the first tau-lepton event (evidence of muon-neutrino oscillation) in 2010, followed by four additional events reported between 2012 and 2015, when the discovery of tau neutrino appearance was first assessed. Thanks to a new analysis strategy applied to the full data sample collected between 2008 and 2012 – the period of neutrino production - a total of 10 candidate events have now been identified, with an extremely high level of significance.</p><blockquote><p>“We have analyzed everything with a completely new strategy, taking into account the peculiar features of the events,” said Giovanni De Lellis Spokesperson for the OPERA collaboration. “We also report the first direct observation of the tau neutrino lepton number, the parameter that discriminates neutrinos from their antimatter counterpart, antineutrinos. It is extremely gratifying to see today that our legacy results largely exceed the level of confidence we had envisaged in the experiment proposal.”</p></blockquote><p>Beyond the contribution of the experiment to a better understanding of the way neutrinos behave, the development of new technologies is also part of the legacy of OPERA. The collaboration was the first to develop fully automated, high-speed readout technologies with sub-micrometric accuracy, which pioneered the large-scale use of the so-called nuclear emulsion films to record particle tracks. Nuclear emulsion technology finds applications in a wide range of other scientific areas from dark matter search to volcano and glacier investigation. It is also applied to optimise the hadron therapy for cancer treatment and was recently used to map out the interior of the Great Pyramid, one of the oldest and largest monuments on Earth, built during the dynasty of the pharaoh Khufu, also known as Cheops.</p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> CERN </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=i4y7jClR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=cdbrdgUL 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=gnSwgRzV 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=advvM5vJ 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/CE0305H.jpg?itok=NL3pbbax" alt="Joe Incandela, CERN spokesperson for Higgs Boson search update (Courtesy: Maximilien Brice, Laurent Egli)" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. They use the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments to study the basic constituents of matter – the fundamental particles. The particles are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives the physicists clues about how the particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature.</p><p><strong>Contact information</strong><br /> European Organization for Nuclear Research<br /> CERN<br /> CH-1211 Genève 23<br /> Switzerland<br /><br /> or<br /><br /> Organisation Européenne pour<br /> la Recherche Nucléaire<br /> F-01631 CERN Cedex<br /> France<br /> + 41 22 76 761 11<br /> + 41 22 76 765 55 (fax)<br /> &nbsp;</p></div><a href="https://home.cern/" target="_blank">https://home.cern/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p><a href="https://press.cern/" target="_blank">Press Office</a><br /> Arnaud Marsollier<br /><a href="mailto:Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch">Arnaud.Marsollier@cern.ch</a>&nbsp;<br /><a href="mailto:Press.office@cern.ch">Press.office@cern.ch</a><br /> + 41 22 76 74101</p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/CERNTV" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/cern/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/About/Global-en.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Funding</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Tue, 22 May 2018 12:20:37 +0000 xeno 14331 at https://www.interactions.org PROSPECTing for antineutrinos https://www.interactions.org/press-release/prospecting-antineutrinos PROSPECTing for antineutrinosPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Fri, 05/18/2018 - 10:001518<div class="pr-body"><h4>Issued on behalf of the PROSPECT Collaboration and Oak Ridge National Laboratories</h4><p>The Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment (PROSPECT) has completed the installation of a novel antineutrino detector that will probe the possible existence of a new form of matter.</p><p><a name="_gjdgxs"></a>PROSPECT, located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has begun taking data to study electron antineutrinos that are emitted from nuclear decays in the reactor to search for so-called sterile neutrinos and to learn about the underlying nuclear reactions that power fission reactors.</p><p>Antineutrinos are elusive, elementary particles produced in nuclear beta decay. The antineutrino is an antimatter particle, the counterpart to the neutrino.</p><blockquote><p>“Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe,” said Yale University physicist Karsten Heeger, principal investigator and co-spokesperson for PROSPECT. “The discovery of neutrino oscillation has opened a window to physics beyond the Standard Model of Physics. The study of antineutrinos with PROSPECT allows us to search for a previously unobserved particle, the so-called sterile neutrino, while probing the nuclear processes inside a reactor.”</p></blockquote><p>Over the past few years several neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors have detected fewer antineutrinos than scientists had predicted, and the energy of the neutrinos did not match expectations. This, in combination with earlier anomalous results, led to the hypothesis that a fraction of electron antineutrinos may transform into sterile neutrinos that would have remained undetected in previous experiments.</p><p>This hypothesized transformation would take place through a quantum mechanical process called neutrino oscillation. The first observation of neutrino oscillation amongst known types of neutrinos from the sun and the atmosphere led to the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics.</p><p>The installation of PROSPECT follows four years of intensive research and development by a collaboration of more than 60 participants from 10 universities and four national laboratories.</p><blockquote><p>“The development of PROSPECT is based on years of research in the detection of reactor antineutrinos with surface-based detectors, an extremely challenging task because of high backgrounds,” said PROSPECT co-spokesperson Pieter Mumm, a scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).</p></blockquote><p>The experiment uses a novel antineutrino detector system based on a segmented liquid scintillator detector technology. The combination of segmentation and a unique, lithium-doped liquid scintillator formulation allows PROSPECT to identify particle types and interaction points. These design features, along with extensive, tailored shielding, will enable PROSPECT to make a precise measurement of neutrinos in the high-background environment of a nuclear reactor.</p><p>PROSPECT’s detector technology also may have applications in the monitoring of nuclear reactors for non-proliferation purposes and the measurement of neutrons from nuclear processes.</p><blockquote><p>“The successful operation of PROSPECT will allow us to gain insight into one of the fundamental puzzles in neutrino physics and develop a better understanding of reactor fuel, while also providing a new tool for nuclear safeguards,” said co-spokesperson Nathaniel Bowden, a scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and an expert in nuclear non-proliferation technology.</p></blockquote><p>After two years of construction and final assembly at the Yale Wright Laboratory, the PROSPECT detector was transported to HFIR in early 2018.</p><blockquote><p>“The development and construction of PROSPECT has been a significant team effort, making use of the complementary expertise at U.S. national laboratories and universities,” said Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri, leader of the Neutrino and Advanced Detectors group in ORNL’s Physics Division.</p></blockquote><p>PROSPECT is the latest in a series of fundamental science experiments located at HFIR.</p><blockquote><p>“We are excited to work with PROSPECT scientists to support their research,” said Chris Bryan, who manages experiments at HFIR for ORNL’s Research Reactors Division.</p></blockquote><p>The experiment is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the National Science Foundation. Additional support comes from Yale University, the Illinois Institute of Technology, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LDRD program. The collaboration also benefits from the support and hospitality of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.</p><p><a href="https://wlab.yale.edu/prospecting-antineutrinos">View images</a></p><p><strong>Additional Contacts</strong></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">Jim Shelton (203) 432-3881&nbsp;<a href="mailto:james.shelton@yale.edu">james.shelton@yale.edu</a></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">Anne Stark (925) 422-9799&nbsp;<a href="mailto:stark8@llnl.gov">stark8@llnl.gov</a></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">Charles Boutin (301) 975-4261 <a href="mailto:charles.boutin@nist.gov">charles.boutin@nist.gov</a></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">Dawn Levy (865) 576-6448 or <a href="mailto:levyd@ornl.gov">levyd@ornl.gov</a></p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Brookhaven National Laboratory </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=nVKLwBIS 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=TvOp5TE6 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=TvOp5TE6 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=TvOp5TE6 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=7-3eyUri 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=7-3eyUri 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=TvOp5TE6 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=lKuKuxVj 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=lKuKuxVj 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=lKuKuxVj 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/BN0012H.jpg?itok=NXysUEXp" alt="Brookhaven National Laboratory" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>We advance fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics to gain a deeper understanding of matter, energy, space, and time; apply photon sciences and nanomaterials research to energy challenges of critical importance to the nation; and perform cross-disciplinary research on climate change, sustainable energy, and Earth’s ecosystems.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p><br /> &nbsp;</p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="organization">Brookhaven National Laboratory</span><br><span class="address-line1">P.O. Box 5000</span><br><span class="locality">Upton</span>, <span class="administrative-area">NY</span><span class="postal-code">11973-5000</span><br><span class="country">United States</span></p></div><p class="phone"> + 1 631 344 8000 </p><a href="https://www.bnl.gov/world/" target="_blank">https://www.bnl.gov/world/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p><a href="http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/media.html" target="_blank">Media and Communications Office</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> Peter Genzer<br /> + 1 631 344 5056&nbsp;<br /><a href="mailto:genzer@bnl.gov">genzer@bnl.gov</a><br /> &nbsp;</p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://www.interactions.org/imagebank/search_public.php?offset=0&amp;keywords=&amp;lab=BN&amp;limit=5" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brookhaven in the Interactions.org Image Bank </a></li><li><a href="http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/images.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brookhaven photo database</a></li><li><a href="http://www.interactions.org/cms/?pid=1000912" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">News coverage from Interactions.org</a></li><li><a href="http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/pubaf/pr/news_releases.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Press releases</a></li><li><a href="http://www.linkedin.com/companies/brookhaven-national-laboratory" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a></li><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/BrookhavenLab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/brookhavenlab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://science.energy.gov/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Funding - DOE Office of Science</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Fri, 18 May 2018 15:00:00 +0000 xeno 14326 at https://www.interactions.org