Interactions https://www.interactions.org/ en What's Up With Antimatter? https://www.interactions.org/blog/whats-antimatter <div id="main"> <div class="hero"> <div> <div> <div class="block-region-hero"><h1> What&#039;s Up With Antimatter? </h1>8th February 2018<label> - </label><div class="author"><a href="/physicist/peter-knapp" class="author" hreflang="en">Peter Knapp</a></div></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="main"> <div class="main-top"> <div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=MZRsHToJ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=whEKPzk4 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=whEKPzk4 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=whEKPzk4 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=vxbTjQcg 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=vxbTjQcg 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=whEKPzk4 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=9y6_Uv6H 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=9y6_Uv6H 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=9y6_Uv6H 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/Peter%20Knapp%20Tour%20Guide.JPG?itok=Z9MXgSjE" alt="Peter Knapp leading a tour" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div> </div> <div class="block-region-main"><div class="paragraph paragraph--type--pa-si paragraph--view-mode--default paragraph--id--475 paragraph--width__medium"><section style=" "><p>Back to work at CERN this week. The whole collaboration came together from all over the world for three days of discussion about what has happened over 2017 and the plans for next year. The construction of ALPHA-g (a device that will determine how antimatter falls in gravity) will call for ‘all hands on deck’ over the coming months as a space is cleared and the experiment is constructed. It will be wedged in the middle of the existing ALPHA apparatus, requiring one end to be rolled out by 4 metres to leave a space for the vertical atom trap to be installed. It will stand around 3 metres high and make our already-busy experiment even busier; it’s starting to feel a bit like the Industrial Zone in Sonic the Hedgehog.</p><p dir="ltr"><meta charset="utf-8" /><b id="docs-internal-guid-52e429b1-7646-0e67-6d30-f8282db54af0"><img alt="" height="234" src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/B63O53msOohnw8yHzaWG_XWLoolTlT_eFggV-Gr_Cu4I9Ad1Wufz0R1soMiDl8maO1oz5sZGZO4Yr5TVgnczX8m2w_eEAX3qZP5AQu_m4zJ4da9VVnnsegihGfjL9k7Zp2PV7oGB" width="312" /></b></p><p dir="ltr">You can still be a tourist working in a place as large as CERN. The LHC’s experiments are now open for tourists, although you have to book a place on a tour to go down. I took my video camera and spent the 15 minutes in the cavern interviewing a PhD student. When I was looking for videos on YouTube before I came to work at CERN there was very little out there about people like me; always experts in the field or presenters wowing things up. I wanted find out what life is really like for a research student at CERN, and this is a series I plan to make. Hopefully there will be about six interviews from researchers at a few varied experiments at the site.</p><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">My main ALPHA-g job this week is to make five aluminium boxes containing electronics to power five cameras that can image plasmas. The tasks include designing metal parts in software and sending the designs to a private company to make them, soldering and screwing the parts, and testing the components before they are fitted. More specifically, the camera is actually merely the imaging part of the apparatus, and the device that requires the power (with up to 5000 volts) are called MCPs (Micro-Channel Plates) that convert plasmas into electrons as they hit small channels of metal. These electrons then shower away and hit the channel again, liberating a few more. The high voltage is required to accelerate the electrons and give them enough energy to knock more off when they strike the metal again. This multiplying effect allows a small signal to be amplified and, once the electrons are converted into photons by a phosphor plate, allows a camera to image the size and number of particles hitting it. This is useful to know because only with this information can we change things around to improve the number of antihydrogen atoms made.</p><p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="125" src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/kVW5mqsu-bOdmlaxpI245NJre5suzhVUQa6DNHZAUB1y7Tk6jBRI1cEO-ptHMbeoZDo55GqG8PCwI2GySqjLaB9RVv7yEdb6EN77Y2bOfe12Apu8trRrYTfH9m1cL83Q1oNMhjhK" width="300" /></p><p>Since being back I have given a<a href="https://twitter.com/Sci_of_Steph/status/956537117269745666"> tour of the Antimatter Factory</a> to a group of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths) Inspiration Award winners and three school talks. Over the coming weekend I will give a further three tours of the experiment to CERN alumni. It may seem like a lot, and all of it is unpaid, being a Master’s student, but this scientific world is just so interesting that it is a dream to tap into people’s curiosities and explain what unimaginable technology and science is at work here. I just have to find more time to earn money to pay the rent...<meta charset="utf-8" /></p></section></div></div> <div class="main-bottom"><div class="block-region-mainbottom"><label>Institution</label><span class="institution-item"> CERN </span></div></div> </div> </div> Thu, 08 Feb 2018 16:29:24 +0000 xeno 14214 at https://www.interactions.org Muon machine makes milestone magnetic map https://www.interactions.org/news/muon-machine-makes-milestone-magnetic-map <div id="main" class="with-elements"> <div class="main"> <div class="element"> <div class="block-region-main"><div class="date"><time datetime="2018-01-29T11:07:20Z">January 29th, 2018</time></div><h1> Muon machine makes milestone magnetic map </h1><div class="source"> Phys.org </div><a href="/topics/technology" hreflang="en">Technology</a><a href="/institution/fermi-national-accelerator-laboratory" hreflang="und">Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:07:20 +0000 xeno 14200 at https://www.interactions.org Peter Picks a Pack of Particle Physicists https://www.interactions.org/blog/peter-picks-pack-particle-physicists <div id="main"> <div class="hero"> <div> <div> <div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Peter Picks a Pack of Particle Physicists </h1>25th January 2018<label> - </label><div class="author"><a href="/physicist/peter-knapp" class="author" hreflang="en">Peter Knapp</a></div></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="main"> <div class="main-top"> <div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/peter.jpg?itok=uKuj6lbQ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/peter.jpg?itok=fzKqOvnR 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/peter.jpg?itok=fzKqOvnR 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/peter.jpg?itok=fzKqOvnR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/peter.jpg?itok=s0PgRDrW 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/peter.jpg?itok=s0PgRDrW 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/peter.jpg?itok=fzKqOvnR 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/peter.jpg?itok=YDboonKm 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/peter.jpg?itok=YDboonKm 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/peter.jpg?itok=YDboonKm 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/peter.jpg?itok=_KFzX5PN" alt="Peter sitting in the snow with a laptop mountains in the background" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture></article></div></div> </div> <div class="block-region-main"><div class="paragraph paragraph--type--pa-si paragraph--view-mode--default paragraph--id--468 paragraph--width__medium"><section style=" "><p>&nbsp;</p><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><p>A Masters in Antimatter Physics at CERN is both hands-on and full-on. Since August I have learnt a huge amount about an experiment that produces atoms of antihydrogen and then studies their response to various lasers. Working with a small(ish) collaboration of around 20 people on-site means that I work on all aspects of the experiment. The collaboration includes about 20 more working from countries around the world, who drop in for a week or so every now and then to keep hands-on. I climb under the experiment to change cables, operate the machinery, interpret the data, and design and build software and hardware that I install myself. It seems the most important line in any job description is truly the final line: "and other duties as assigned". This incredible experience has come at a price in my case; a social life at CERN is something you can’t easily develop. In this series of four blog posts I aim to give an honest impression of my own experience working as a 32-year-old MRes student at CERN.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">The ALPHA experiment that I work on at CERN is focused on producing antihydrogen - an atom consisting of an antiproton and a positron - and trying to find if/how it is different to hydrogen. Only by finding any difference experimentally can we get ideas about why there were a billion-and-one matter particles compared to a billion antimatter particles when they were created shortly after the Big Bang. There may be some subtle difference between the spectral lines of hydrogen and antihydrogen, and this is currently being investigated. Future experimentation from ALPHA includes testing how antihydrogen reacts to the gravitational field, i.e. if they fall at the same rate of 9.81… ms^-2.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">CERN is a great place for inquisitive minds. University recruitment fairs are often comprised of companies that can afford to foot the bill for setting up a stand and this makes profit a part of their ethos. You will never see CERN at one of these. That simple fact highlights a huge benefit to working at a place like this; it’s all about the science. I applied to Swansea University to study for this year-long Masters in the hope that it would give me insight into working in science and whether it would encourage me to continue on to a PhD. I am now five months in and the time to make a decision has arrived all too quickly.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">I am writing this first post from the Physics school of Les Houches in the French Alps, which has run courses throughout the years from 1951 and 44 of the students or lecturers have been awarded either a Nobel Prize or a Fields Medal.</p><blockquote><p dir="ltr"><strong>To be sat in the same lecture hall that Feynman, Pauli, and Fermi have lectured in really makes you feel like you’re a part of the very quickly developing world of Physics. The two-week course on Plasma Physics is delivered by experts in the field (pun aside) and designed to help PhD students learn some theory and wisdom from those who have spent years getting to the top.</strong></p></blockquote><p dir="ltr">Lectures start at 8:45am and after a three-hour break in the afternoon to either enjoy the mountains or work through the physics exercises we finish at 9:30pm. The free coffee known as ‘physics food’ helps to keep the eyes open and the brain alert through the fascinating yet intense lectures. Explaining my project during a poster session was very useful as both PhD students and professors probed my methods until they could offer advice and connect me with people doing similar projects, helping the community of plasma physics to get to know each other, something that will, no doubt, be useful for a lifelong career in Physics.</p><p dir="ltr">I'm eager to see what tomorrow brings.</p></section></div></div> <div class="main-bottom"><div class="block-region-mainbottom"><label>Institution</label><span class="institution-item"> CERN </span></div></div> </div> </div> Thu, 25 Jan 2018 15:21:19 +0000 xeno 14198 at https://www.interactions.org Neural Networks for Neutrinos https://www.interactions.org/news/neural-networks-neutrinos <div id="main" class="with-elements"> <div class="main"> <div class="element"> <div class="block-region-main"><div class="date"><time datetime="2018-01-24T13:03:01Z">January 24th, 2018</time></div><h1> Neural Networks for Neutrinos </h1><div class="source"> Symmetry Magazine </div><a href="/topics/neutrinos" hreflang="en">Neutrinos</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 24 Jan 2018 19:03:01 +0000 xeno 14197 at https://www.interactions.org New for three types of extreme-energy space particles: Theory shows unified origin https://www.interactions.org/news/new-three-types-extreme-energy-space-particles-theory-shows <div id="main" class="with-elements"> <div class="main"> <div class="element"> <div class="block-region-main"><div class="date"><time datetime="2018-01-22T16:32:14Z">January 22nd, 2018</time></div><h1> New for three types of extreme-energy space particles: Theory shows unified origin </h1><div class="source"> Phys.org </div><a href="/topics/neutrinos" hreflang="en">Neutrinos</a></div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 22 Jan 2018 22:32:14 +0000 xeno 14195 at https://www.interactions.org UK builds vital component of global neutrino experiment https://www.interactions.org/press-release/uk-builds-vital-component-global-neutrino-experiment UK builds vital component of global neutrino experimentPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Tue, 01/16/2018 - 09:10318<div class="pr-body"><p>The UK has built an essential piece of the globally-anticipated DUNE experiment, which will study the differences between neutrinos and anti-neutrinos in a bid to understand how the Universe came to be made up of matter.</p><p>Vital components of the DUNE detectors have been constructed in the UK and have now been shipped to CERN for initial testing, marking a significant milestone for the experiment’s progress.</p><p>DUNE (the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) is a flagship international experiment run by the United States Department of Energy’s Fermilab that involves over 1,000 scientists from 31 countries. Various elements of the experiment are under construction across the world, with the UK taking a major role in contributing essential expertise and components to the experiment and facility.</p><p>Using a particle accelerator, an intense beam of neutrinos will be fired 800 miles through the earth from Fermilab in Chicago to the DUNE experiment in South Dakota. There the incoming beam will be studied using DUNE’s liquid-argon detector.</p><p>The DUNE project aims to advance our understanding of the origin and structure of the universe. One aspect of study is the behaviour of particles called neutrinos and their antimatter counterparts, antineutrinos. This could provide insight as to why we live in a matter-dominated universe and inform the debate on why the universe survived the Big Bang.</p><p>A UK team has just completed their first prototype Anode Plane Assembly (APA), the largest component of the DUNE detector, to be used in the protoDUNE detector at CERN. The APA, which was built at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s (STFC) Daresbury Laboratory, is the first such anode plane to ever have been built in the UK.</p><p>The APAs are large rectangular steel frames covered with approximately 4000 wires that are used to read the signal from particle tracks generated inside the liquid-argon detector. At 2.3m by 6.3m, the impressive frames are roughly as large as five full-size pool tables led side-by-side.</p><p>Dr Justin Evans of the University of Manchester, who is leading the protoDUNE APA-construction project in the UK, said: “This shipment marks the culmination of a year of very hard work by the team, which has members from STFC Daresbury and the Universities of Manchester, Liverpool, Sheffield and Lancaster. Constructing this anode plane has required relentless attention to detail, and huge dedication to addressing the challenges of building something for the first time. This is a major milestone on our way to doing exciting physics with the protoDUNE and DUNE detectors.”</p><p>These prototype frames were funded through an STFC grant. The 150 APAs that the UK will produce for the large-scale DUNE detector will be paid for as part of the £65million investment by the UK in the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.stfc.ac.uk/news/uk-signs-65m-science-partnership-agreement-with-us/">UK-US Science and Technology agreement</a>, which was announced in September last year.</p><p>Mechanical engineer Alan Grant has led the organisation of the project on behalf of STFC’s Daresbury Laboratory. He said: “This is an exciting milestone for the UK’s contribution to the DUNE project.</p><p>“The planes are a vital part of the liquid-argon detectors and are one of the biggest component contributions the UK is making to DUNE, so it is thrilling to have the first one ready for shipping and testing.</p><p>“We have a busy few years ahead of us at the Daresbury Laboratory as we are planning to build 150 panels for one of DUNE’s modules, but we are looking forward to meeting the challenge.”</p><p>The UK’s first complete APA began the long journey to CERN by road on Friday (January 12), and arrived in Geneva today (January 16). Once successfully tested on the protoDUNE experiment at CERN, a full set of panels will be created and eventually be installed one-mile underground at Fermilab’s Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota.</p><p>This is the first such plane to be delivered by the UK to CERN for testing, with the second and third panels set to be shipped in spring. It is expected to take two to three years to produce the full 150 APAs for one module.</p><p>Professor Alfons Weber, of STFC and Oxford University, is the overall Principal Investigator of DUNE UK. He said: “We in the UK are gearing up to deliver several major components for the DUNE experiment and the LBNF facility, which also include the data acquisition system, accelerator components and the neutrino production target. These prototype APAs, which will be installed and tested at CERN, are one of the first major deliveries that will make this exciting experiment a reality.”</p><p>The DUNE APA consortium is led by Professor Stefan Söldner-Rembold of the University of Manchester, with contributions from several other North West universities including Liverpool, Sheffield and Lancaster.</p><p>Professor Söldner-Rembold said: “Each one of the four final DUNE modules will contain 17,000 tons of liquid argon. For a single module, 150 APAs will need to be built which represents a major construction challenge. We are working with UK industry to prepare this large construction project. The wires are kept under tension and we need to ensure that none of the wires will break during several decades of detector operation as the inside of the detector will not be accessible. The planes will now undergo rigorous testing to make sure they are up for the job.</p><p>“Physicists across the world are excited to see what DUNE will be capable of, as unlocking the secrets of the neutrino will help us understand more about the structure of the Universe.</p><p>“Although neutrinos are the second most abundant particle in the Universe, they are enormously difficult to catch as they have very nearly no mass, are not charged and rarely interact with other particles. This is why DUNE is such an exciting experiment and why we are celebrating this milestone in its construction.”</p><p>Christos Touramanis, from the University of Liverpool and co-spokesperson for the protoDUNE project, said: “ProtoDUNE is the first CERN experiment which is a prototype for an experiment at Fermilab, a demonstration of global strategy and coordination in modern particle physics. We in the UK have been instrumental in setting up protoDUNE and in addition to my role we provide leadership in the data acquisition sub-project, and of course anode planes.”</p><p>DUNE will also watch for neutrinos produced when a star explodes, which could reveal the formation of neutron stars and black holes, and will investigate whether protons live forever or eventually decay, bringing us closer to fulfilling Einstein’s dream of a grand unified theory.</p><section><h3>Media Contact</h3><p><a href="mailto:becky.parker-ellis@stfc.ac.uk">Becky Parker-Ellis</a><br /> Tel: +44(0)1793 444564<br /> Mob: +44(0)7808 879294</p><h3>About DUNE</h3><p>The international Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermilab, will provide insight into the origin of matter in the universe. LBNF will create the world’s most intense high-energy neutrino beam and send it 1300km from Fermilab in Illinois towards the 70,000 ton DUNE detector one mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota. Once constructed, LBNF and DUNE will operate for at least 15 years undertaking a broad and exciting science programme.</p><p>Fermilab is America’s premier national laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research. A U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, Fermilab is located near Chicago, Illinois, and operated under contract by the Fermi Research Alliance LLC, a joint partnership between the University of Chicago and the Universities Research Association, Inc.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fnal.gov/">Visit Fermilab’s website</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/Fermilab">follow us on Twitter</a>.</p><p>More information about the facility and experiment can be found at:</p><p><a href="http://lbnf.fnal.gov/">Fermilab - Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF)</a><br /><a href="http://www.dunescience.org/">DUNE - An international mega-science project</a></p><p>UK involvement with the DUNE collaboration is through STFC and the following universities: Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Durham, Edinburgh, Imperial, Lancaster, Liverpool, UCL, Manchester, Oxford, Sheffield, Sussex and Warwick. They provide essential expertise and components to the experiment and facility. This ranges from the high-power neutrino production target, the readout planes, accelerator development associated with PIP-II and data acquisitions systems to the reconstruction software.</p><p>STFC manages the UK’s investment in the international facility, giving UK scientists and engineers the chance to take a leading role in the management and development of the DUNE far detector and the LBNF beam line. The STFC Technology Department is also involved in the data acquisition system for the detector and in designing a high power neutrino production target.</p></section></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Science and Technology Facilities Council </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=EzNwJEy_ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=htLYCGnM 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=htLYCGnM 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=htLYCGnM 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=THgpweUl 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=THgpweUl 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=htLYCGnM 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=9K7PBwQJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=9K7PBwQJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=9K7PBwQJ 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/ST0021H.jpg?itok=PsldW44I" alt="Pictured here is Dr Chris Frost, ChipIR project scientist at ISIS." typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture><div class="caption"><p>UK scientists have built a new facility aimed at understanding how particles from space can interact with electronic devices, and to investigate the chaos that cosmic rays can cause – such as taking communications satellites offline, wiping a device's memory or affecting aircraft electronics. ChipIR has successfully completed its first round of development testing before going in to full operation in 2015. Pictured here is Dr Chris Frost, ChipIR project scientist at ISIS. (Credit: STFC)</p></div></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>The Science and Technology Facilities Council is part of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ukri.org/">UK Research and Innovation</a>&nbsp;– the UK body which works in partnership with universities, research organisations, businesses, charities, and government to create the best possible environment for research and innovation to flourish. STFC funds and supports research in particle and nuclear physics, astronomy, gravitational research and astrophysics, and space science and also operates a network of five national laboratories as well as supporting UK research at a number of international research facilities including CERN, FERMILAB and the ESO telescopes in Chile. STFC keeps the UK at the forefront of international science, has a broad science portfolio and works with the academic and industrial communities to share its expertise.</p></div><div class="institution-body"><h2>Universities</h2><p>We support UK university-based research, innovation and skills development in astronomy, particle physics, nuclear physics, and space science. We support an academic community of around 1,700 in particle physics, nuclear physics, and astronomy including space science, who work at more than 50 universities and research institutes in the UK, Europe, Japan and the United States, including a rolling cohort of more than 900 PhD students.</p><h2>Facilities</h2><p>We provide access to world-leading, large-scale facilities across a range of physical and life sciences, enabling research, innovation and skills training in these areas&nbsp;</p><h2>Collaboration</h2><p>We work with partners to build National Science and Innovation Campuses at Harwell and Sci-Tech Daresbury based around our National Laboratories to promote academic and industrial collaboration and translation of our research to market through direct interaction with industry</p><h2>Public Engagement</h2><p>We help ensure a future pipeline of skilled and enthusiastic young people by using the excitement of our sciences to encourage wider take-up of STEM subjects in school and future life (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)</p><hr /><p>STFC funds UK physicists collaborating in projects all over the world. The&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/particle-physics/">particle physics</a>programme is guided by the&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/about-us/how-we-are-governed/advisory-boards/particle-physics-advisory-panel/">Particle Physics Advisory Panel</a>&nbsp;and based on our&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/science-challenges/">Science Challenges</a>.</p><p>STFC supports physicists working on a wide range of experiments in our own laboratories, such as the&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/particle-physics/particle-physics-department/">Particle Physics Department</a>&nbsp;at the&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/about-us/where-we-work/rutherford-appleton-laboratory/">Rutherford Appleton Laboratory</a>, and university research through its experimental and theory consolidated grants, fellowships and studentship grants.</p><p>STFC is one of the major contributors to&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/cern/">CERN</a>&nbsp;and supports UK researchers working on&nbsp;all four of the&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/large-hadron-collider/">LHC</a>&nbsp;(Large Hadron Collider) detectors:</p><ul><li><a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/large-hadron-collider/atlas/">ATLAS</a>&nbsp;(A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS)</li><li><a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/large-hadron-collider/cms/">CMS</a>&nbsp;(Compact Muon Solenoid)</li><li><a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/cern/lhcb/">LHCb</a>&nbsp;(Large Hadron Collider beauty)</li><li><a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/particle-physics-and-particle-astrophysics/large-hadron-collider/alice/">ALICE</a>&nbsp;(A Large Ion Collider Experiment)</li></ul><p>In addition, STFC has made a significant investment in the computing (GRID) infrastructure as part of the worldwide LHC Computing&nbsp;<a href="https://stfc.ukri.org/research/computational-science/gridpp/">Grid</a>&nbsp;(wLCG) which is vital for handling the massive amount of data that CERN will produce.</p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="organization">Science and Technology Facilities Council</span><br><span class="address-line1">Polaris Way</span><br><span class="locality">Swindon</span><br><span class="postal-code">SN2 1SZ</span><br><span class="country">United Kingdom</span></p></div><p class="phone"> +44 1793 442000 </p><a href="http://www.stfc.ac.uk/" target="_blank">http://www.stfc.ac.uk/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p>STFC Press Office<br /> Email: <a href="mailto:PRESSOFFICE@stfc.ac.uk">PRESSOFFICE@stfc.ac.uk</a>&nbsp;<br /> Telephone number for press queries: <a href="tel:4407092982664">+44 (0)7092 982 664</a></p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Science-and-Technology-Facilities-Council/365781566770304?fref=ts" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">STFC Facebook</a></li><li><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/stfc" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">STFC LinkedIn</a></li><li><a href="https://twitter.com/STFC_Matters" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">STFC Twitter</a></li><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/SciTechUK" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">STFC YouTube Channel</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Tue, 16 Jan 2018 15:10:08 +0000 xeno 14193 at https://www.interactions.org Dark Energy Survey publicly releases first three years of data https://www.interactions.org/press-release/dark-energy-survey-publicly-releases-first-three-years-data Dark Energy Survey publicly releases first three years of dataPress Release<span><span lang="" about="/users/xeno" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">xeno</span></span> Wed, 01/10/2018 - 11:47218<div class="pr-body"><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><h2><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">Also announces discovery of eleven stellar streams, evidence of small galaxies being eaten by the Milky Way</span></span></span></i></h2><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">At a special session held during the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C., scientists on the Dark Energy Survey (DES) announced today the public release of their first three years of data. This first major release of data from the Survey includes information on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies billions of light years away as well as stars in our own galaxy.</span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">DES scientists are using this data to learn more about dark energy, the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, and presented some of their preliminary cosmological findings in the special session. As part of that session, DES scientists also announced today the discovery of eleven new stellar streams, remnants of smaller galaxies torn apart and devoured by our Milky Way. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">The public release of the first three years of DES data fulfills a commitment scientists on the survey made to share their findings with the astronomy community and the public. The data cover the full DES footprint – about 5,000 square degrees, or one eighth of the entire sky – and include roughly 40,000 exposures taken with the Dark Energy Camera. The images correspond to hundreds of terabytes of data and are being released along with catalogs of hundreds of millions of galaxies and stars. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">“There are all kinds of discoveries waiting to be found in the data,” said Dark Energy Survey Data Management Project Scientist Brian Yanny of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. “While DES scientists are focused on using it to learn about dark energy, we wanted to enable astronomers to explore these images in new ways, to improve our understanding of the universe.”</span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">“The great thing about a big astronomical survey like this is that it also opens a door to many other studies, like the new stellar streams,” added Adam Bolton, Associate Director for the Community Science and Data Center at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). “With the DES data now available as a ‘digital sky,’ accessible to all, my hope is that these data will lead to the crowdsourcing of new and unexpected discoveries.”&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">The DES data can be accessed online here: </span></span><a href="https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/dr1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">https://des.ncsa.illinois.edu/releases/dr1</span></a><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">The Dark Energy Camera, the primary observation tool of the Dark Energy Survey, is one of the most powerful digital imaging devices in existence. It was built and tested at Fermilab, the lead laboratory on the Dark Energy Survey, and is mounted on the National Science Foundation’s 4-meter Blanco telescope, part of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, a division of NOAO. The DES images are processed by a team at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">“We’re excited that this release of high-quality imaging data is now accessible to researchers around the world,” said Matias Carrasco Kind, DES release scientist at&nbsp;NCSA.&nbsp;“While DES was designed with the goal of understanding dark energy and dark matter, the huge amount of data in these images and catalogs will bring new scientific applications, challenges, and opportunities for discovery to astronomers and data scientists. In collaboration, NCSA, NOAO and the LIneA group in Brazil are providing the tools and resources to access and analyze this rich and robust data set.”&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">One new discovery enabled by the data set is the detection of eleven new streams of</span><span style="font-size:10.0pt">stars around our Milky Way. </span><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Our home galaxy is surrounded by a massive halo of dark matter, which exerts a powerful gravitational pull on smaller, nearby galaxies. The Milky Way grows by pulling in, ripping apart and absorbing these smaller systems. As stars are torn away, they form streams across the sky that can be detected using the Dark Energy Camera.&nbsp; Even so, </span></span><span style="font-size:10.0pt">stellar streams are extremely difficult to</span><span style="font-size:10.0pt">find since they are composed of relatively few stars spread out over a</span><span style="font-size:10.0pt">large area of sky. </span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">“It’s exciting that we found so many stellar streams,” said astrophysicist Alex Drlica-Wagner of Fermilab. “We can use these streams to measure the amount, distribution, and clumpiness of dark matter in the Milky Way. Studies of stellar streams will help constrain the fundamental properties of dark matter.” </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Prior to the new discoveries by DES, only about two dozen stellar streams had been discovered. Many of them were found by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a precursor to the Dark Energy Survey. The effort to detect new stellar streams in the Dark Energy Survey was led by University of Chicago graduate student Nora Shipp. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">“We’re interested in these streams because they teach us about the formation and structure of the Milky Way and its dark matter halo. Stellar streams give us a snapshot of a larger galaxy being built out of smaller ones,” said Shipp. “These discoveries are possible because DES is the widest, deepest and best-calibrated survey out there.”</span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Since there is no universally accepted naming convention for stellar streams, the Dark Energy Survey has reached out to schools in Chile and Australia, asking young students to select names. Students and their teachers have worked together to name the streams after aquatic words in native languages from northern Chile and aboriginal Australia. Read more about the names in this story from Symmetry: </span></span><a href="https://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/rivers-in-the-sky" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">https://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/rivers-in-the-sky</span></a><u style="text-underline:#0b4cb4"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#0b4cb4">. </span></span></u></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Read the papers drawn from the first years of DES data online here: </span></span><a href="https://www.darkenergysurvey.org/dr1-data-release-papers" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">https://www.darkenergysurvey.org/dr1-data-release-papers</span></a><u style="text-underline:blue"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:blue">. </span></span></u><span style="font-size:10.0pt">An animation of several of the newly discovered streams can be seen here: </span><a href="http://home.fnal.gov/~kadrlica/movies/residual_q1_v17p2_label.gif" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">http://home.fnal.gov/~kadrlica/movies/residual_q1_v17p2_label.gif</span></a><span style="font-size:10.0pt">. </span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">DES plans one more major public data </span></span><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">release, after the survey is completed, which will include nearly twice as many exposures as in this release. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#191919">"This result is an excellent example of how ‘data mining’ — the exploration of large data sets — leads to new discoveries,” said Richard Green, Director of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Astronomical Sciences. "NSF is investing in this approach through our Foundation-wide `Harnessing the Data Revolution’ initiative, which is encouraging fundamental research in data science. We’re expecting a drumbeat of exciting discoveries, particularly when the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (</span></span><a href="http://www.lsst.org)" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">http://www.lsst.org)</span></a><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#191919"> data floodgates are opened!"</span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. </span></span></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin-bottom:7.5pt; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">The Dark Energy Survey is a collaboration of more than 400 scientists from 26 institutions in seven countries. Funding for the DES Projects has been provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, U.S. National Science Foundation, Ministry of Science and Education of Spain, Science and Technology Facilities Council of the United Kingdom, Higher Education Funding Council for England, ETH Zurich for Switzerland, National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago, Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics at Ohio State University, Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&amp;M University, Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos, Fundação Carlos Chagas Filho de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico and Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the collaborating institutions in the Dark Energy Survey, the list of which can be found at&nbsp;</span></span></i><a href="http://www.darkenergysurvey.org/collaboration" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">www.darkenergysurvey.org/collaboration</span></span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">.</span></span></i></span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom:7.5pt; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">&nbsp;</span></span></i></span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom:7.5pt; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. </span></span></i><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="background:white">NSF is an independent federal agency created by Congress&nbsp;in 1950 to promote the progress of science. NSF supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future. </span></span></i></span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom:7.5pt; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="http://www.ncsa.illinois.edu/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt">NCSA</span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"> at the </span></i><a href="http://illinois.edu/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt">University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign</span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"> provides supercomputing and advanced digital resources for the nation’s science enterprise. At NCSA, University of Illinois faculty, staff, students, and collaborators from around the globe use advanced digital resources to address research grand challenges for the benefit of science and society. NCSA has been advancing one third of the Fortune 50® for more than 30 years by bringing industry, researchers, and students together to solve grand challenges at rapid speed and scale. For more information, please visit </span></i><a href="http://www.ncsa.illinois.edu/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt">www.ncsa.illinois.edu</span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt">. </span></i></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Fermilab is America’s premier national laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research. A U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, Fermilab is located near Chicago, Illinois, and operated under contract by the Fermi Research Alliance LLC, a joint partnership between the University of Chicago and the Universities Research Association, Inc. Visit Fermilab’s website at&nbsp;</span></span></i><a href="http://www.fnal.gov/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">www.fnal.gov</span></span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">&nbsp;and follow us on Twitter at&nbsp;</span></span></i><a href="http://twitter.com/fermilab/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">@Fermilab</span></span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">.</span></span></i></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><br /><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">The DOE Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit&nbsp;</span></span></i><a href="http://science.energy.gov/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">science.energy.gov</span></span></i></a><i><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">.</span></span></i></span></span></p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Media contact:</span></span></b></span></span></p><ul><li style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:black"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="vertical-align:baseline"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">Andre Salles, Fermilab Office of Communication, 630-840-3351, </span><a href="mailto:media@fnal.gov"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#0563c1">media@fnal.gov</span></span></a></span></span></span></span></span></li></ul><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><b><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:black">Science contacts:</span></span></b></span></span></p><ul><li style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:black"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="vertical-align:baseline"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">Josh Frieman, Dark </span><span style="font-size:10.0pt">Energy Survey director, Fermilab, 847-274-0429, </span><a href="mailto:frieman@fnal.gov"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#0563c1">frieman@fnal.gov</span></span></a></span></span></span></span></span></li><li style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:black"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="vertical-align:baseline"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt">Alex Drlica-Wagner, Fermilab, 630-840-3662, </span><a href="mailto:kadrlica@fnal.gov"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#0563c1">kadrlica@fnal.gov</span></span></a></span></span></span></span></span></li><li style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="color:black"><span style="tab-stops:list .5in"><span style="vertical-align:baseline"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#191919">Aya Collins, National Science Foundation, 703-292-7737,&nbsp;</span></span><a href="mailto:acollins@nsf.gov"><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="color:#0000e9">acollins@nsf.gov</span></span></a></span></span></span></span></span></li></ul><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p><p style="margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt">&nbsp;</p></div><div class="source"><div id="main" class="with-elements"><div class="hero"><div><div><div class="block-region-hero"><h1> Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory </h1></div></div></div></div><div class="main"><div class="main-top"><div class="block-region-maintop"><div class="header-image"><article><picture><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1.5x" media="all and (min-width: 1200px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=FNGDNWFJ 2x" media="all and (min-width: 798px) and (max-width: 991px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 2x" media="all and (min-width: 601px) and (max-width: 797px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=_vfp927- 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet_portrait/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=_vfp927- 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_tablet/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=vObvySHI 2x" media="all and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px)" type="image/jpeg"/><source srcset="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=zEtRECgE 1x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=zEtRECgE 1.5x, /sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_large_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=zEtRECgE 2x" media="all and (max-width: 399px)" type="image/jpeg"/><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_responsive_small_phone/public/07-0329-14D.jpg?itok=P_KjLDs6" alt="Fermilab from the air" typeof="foaf:Image" /></picture><div class="caption"><p>The Fermilab particle accelerator complex provides beam to numerous experiments and test stations. The accelerators can make beams of protons, neutrinos, muons, and other particles. The two-mile Main Injector makes the world's most intense high-energy neutrino beam. (Photographer: Reidar Hahn)</p></div></article></div></div></div><div class="element"><div class="block-region-main"><div class="institution-body"><p>Fermilab is America's particle physics and accelerator laboratory. Founded in 1967, Fermilab drives discovery by investigating the smallest building blocks of matter using world-leading particle accelerator and detector facilities. We also use the universe as a laboratory, making measurements of the cosmos to the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy. Fermilab is located near Chicago, Illinois, and is managed by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science.<span class="gmail_msg">research universities.</span></p></div><div class="institution-body"><p>What are we made of? How did the universe begin? What secrets do the smallest, most elemental particles of matter hold, and how can they help us understand the intricacies of space and time?</p><p>Since 1967, Fermilab has worked to answer these and other fundamental questions and enhance our understanding of everything we see around us. As the United States' premier particle physics laboratory, we do science that matters. We work together with our international partners on the world's most advanced particle accelerators and dig down to the smallest building blocks of matter. We also probe the farthest reaches of the universe, seeking out the nature of dark matter and dark energy.</p><p>Fermilab's 6,800-acre site is located in Batavia, Illinois, and is managed by the&nbsp;<a class="gmail_msg" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.fra-hq.org/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1489700810529000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEedjZBMT_59JzLCxomHYgD3fsWgg" href="http://www.fra-hq.org/" target="_blank">Fermi Research Alliance LLC</a><span class="gmail_msg">&nbsp;for the&nbsp;</span><a class="gmail_msg" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://energy.gov/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1489700810529000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGy33Kd0F8ltHkJ3R0MLtwuJb3Bog" href="http://energy.gov/" target="_blank">U.S. Department of Energy</a><span class="gmail_msg">&nbsp;</span><a class="gmail_msg" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://science.energy.gov/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1489700810529000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHVJg1e3ZgHKhUPRtw_B8zDvZQPEA" href="http://science.energy.gov/" target="_blank">Office of Science</a><span class="gmail_msg">. FRA is a partnership of the University of Chicago and Universities Research Association Inc., a consortium of 89 </span></p></div><div class="institution-address"><label>Address</label><p class="address" translate="no"><span class="organization">Fermilab</span><br><span class="address-line1">P.O. Box 500</span><br><span class="locality">Batavia</span>, <span class="administrative-area">IL</span><span class="postal-code">60510-0500</span><br><span class="country">United States</span></p></div><p class="phone"> + 1 630 840 3000 </p> , <p class="phone"> + 1 630 840 4343 (fax) </p><a href="http://www.fnal.gov/" target="_blank">http://www.fnal.gov/</a><div class="institution-contactinfo"><label>Contact Info</label><p>Leah Hesla<br /><a href="http://www.fnal.gov/pub/about/communication/index.html" target="_blank">Fermilab Office of Communication</a><br /> + 1 630&nbsp;840 3351<br /> + 1 630 840 8780 (fax)<br /><a href="mailto:media@fnal.gov">media@fnal.gov</a></p></div><div class="institution-links"><label>Links</label><ul class="links"><li><a href="http://news.fnal.gov/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Fermilab Newsroom</a></li><li><a href="http://symmetrymagazine.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Symmetry Magazine</a></li><li><a href="http://www.facebook.com/Fermilab/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Facebook</a></li><li><a href="http://twitter.com/Fermilab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a></li><li><a href="http://www.instagram.com/fermilab/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Instagram</a></li><li><a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/134273042@N07/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Flickr</a></li><li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/fermilab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">YouTube</a></li><li><a href="http://www.linkedin.com/companies/fermilab" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LinkedIn</a></li></ul></div></div></div></div></div> Wed, 10 Jan 2018 17:47:03 +0000 xeno 14191 at https://www.interactions.org